Evidentiary value of suggestions: Supreme Court 2017

IN THE HIGH COURT OF GUJARAT AT AHMEDABAD
LETTERS PATENT APPEAL NO. 473 of 1996
In
FIRST APPEAL NO. 5952 of 1995
FOR APPROVAL AND SIGNATURE:

HONOURABLE MR.JUSTICE J.B.PARDIWALA
==========================================================
1 Whether Reporters of Local Papers may be allowed to
see the judgment ? YES
2 To be referred to the Reporter or not ? YES
3 Whether their Lordships wish to see the fair copy of the
judgment ? NO
4 Whether this case involves a substantial question of
law as to the interpretation of the Constitution of India
or any order made thereunder ? NO
CIRCULATE THE JUDGMENT AMONGST THE JUDICIAL
OFFICERS OF THE SUBORDINATE COURTS.
==========================================================
LEGAL HERIS OF DECD.UMEDMIYA R RATHOD & 5….Appellant(s)
Versus
STATE OF GUJARAT….Respondent(s)
==========================================================
Appearance:
MR AJ MEMON, ADVOCATE for the Appellant(s) No. 1 – 1.2 , 2 – 6
MR MAULIK G NANAVATI, AGP for the Respondent(s) No. 1
MS NISHA THAKORE WITH MR UTKARSH SHARMA, ASSISTANT
GOVERNMENT PLEADERS for the Respondent No.1
==========================================================
CORAM: HONOURABLE MR.JUSTICE J.B.PARDIWALA
Date : 04/08/2017
Page 1 of 116
HC-NIC Page 1 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
CAV JUDGMENT
1 This Letters Patent Appeal has been placed before me by an order
of the Honourable Chief Justice, as there was a difference of opinion
between Hon’ble Mr. Justice Jayant Patel (as His Lordship then was) and
Hon’ble Mr. Justice S.R. Brahmbhatt when they heard the Letters Patent
Appeal in the first instance. The Hon’ble Judges comprising the Division
Bench, while delivering the judgment and order dated 7th March 2011,
have taken different views in respect of the issues that have arisen in the
subject appeal and have stated the following:
“In view of the aforesaid disagreement by both of us, office is directed to
place the matter before the Hon’ble the Chief Justice for placing the matter
before   the   appropriate   Court   after   obtaining   suitable   orders   from   the
Hon’ble the Chief Justice on administrative side.”
2 I may state that the Letters Patent Appeal is against the judgment
and order dated 16th March 1996 passed in the First Appeal No.5952 of
1995, whereunder the learned Single Judge of this Court (Coram: Y.B.
Bhatt, J.) dismissed the appeal preferred by the plaintiffs / appellants
under   Section   96   of   the   Code   of   Civil   Procedure   challenging   the
judgment and order passed by the City Civil Court dated 10th July 1995
dismissing the suit for damages filed against the State of Gujarat for the
loss caused to the family members of the deceased on account of his
death in firing by an army personal on 20th June 1985.
3 The Hon’ble Justice Mr. S.R. Brahmbhatt dismissed the Letters
Patent Appeal affirming the order passed by the Trial Court as well as by
the learned Single Judge, whereas the Hon’ble Mr. Justice Jayant Patel
quashed and set aside the judgment and decree for dismissal of the suit
Page 2 of 116
HC-NIC Page 2 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
and its confirmation thereof by the learned Single Judge in the First
Appeal, allowing the suit with the decree of compensation of Rs.90,00/­
with interest at the rate of 7% per annum.
4 On 31st  August 2012, the Division  Bench passed the following
order:
“After the order passed by the third Hon’ble Judge (Justice J.B. Pardiwala)
of this Court dated 01.08.2012, the matter is again placed before us for
formulating the points of difference. We have considered the view expressed
by both of us. Hence, the following points of difference ­
1. If no evidence is led in a civil suit by the defendant after filing the
written statement, what will be the effect, whether defence taken in
the written statement could be considered by the Court at the final
decision of the suit or not?
2. When   the   army   is  deployed   for   maintenance   of   law   and   order
within the State at the request of the State Government and any
liability  arise for lapse or otherwise  of the army,  whether  such
would be the liability of the army or the Union of India of its own
or such liability is to be borne by the State Government?
3. In a matter of State opening fire while maintaining law and order
situation,  it will be whose  burden to prove  the justification  for
opening fire, whether upon the State or it would be for the citizen
to prove that there was negligence on the part of State official or
the army official deployed at the State insistence for maintenance of
law and order when civil suit is filed?
Matter now shall be placed by the office before Hon’ble the Chief Justice on
administrative side for appropriate order.”
5 Let   me   now   state   the   facts   in   details.   The   appellants   are   the
original plaintiffs (being the legal heirs of the deceased husband of the
original plaintiff No.3), who filed a Civil Suit No.3605 of 1986 in the
Court of the learned City Civil Judge, Ahmedabad for damages in torts
for an alleged act of negligent firing resulting into the death of the
husband  of  the  third  plaintiff  and  the  appellant  in  the  First  Appeal
Page 3 of 116
HC-NIC Page 3 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
No.5952 of 1995 arising out the Civil Suit No.3605 of 1986.
6 On the fateful day of the incident i.e. on 20th June 1985, when a
‘Rath Yatra’ i.e. the chariot procession of Lord Jagannath was on its way
to the Delhi Darwaja,  via  the Prem Darwaja, at the Jordan Road, the
deceased had gone on the terrace of his neighbour’s building, which was
adjacent to his own house situated 52 to 60 feet away on the western
side of the Jordan Road for collecting the quilt, which was put up for
drying. At that point of time, as pleaded, the Army opened fire recklessly
and negligently, and in the process, the deceased sustained a serious
bullet injury and died. The case of the appellants is that the Army,
without   giving   any   warning   and   without   any   justifiable   reason   and
without   making   any   appeal   to   maintain   peace,   arbitrarily   and
indiscriminately opened fire. It is alleged that the Army personnels, in an
erratic mood, opened fire with an intention to kill the residents of the
surrounding area. It is further averred in the plaint that on 20th  June
1985,   curfew   was   imposed   within   the   walled   area   of   the   city   of
Ahmedabad, and on that date, there was no permission issued by the
Government authorities for taking out the chariot procession. Despite
the same, the persons connected with the chariot procession had taken
out the procession without the permission. The procession started from
the temple of Lord Jagannath. Instead of taking the procession through
outside the Prem Darwaja, the procession entered into the walled city
area through the Prem Darwaja under the surveillance of the Army and
all of a sudden, as alleged, the Army opened fire resulting in the death of
the husband of the appellant No.3 herein.
7 In   the   civil   suit   filed   for   damages,   the   following   issues   were
framed by the Trial Court:
Page 4 of 116
HC-NIC Page 4 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
“ISSUES:
(1) Whether the plaintiffs prove that the deceased Gulam Rasul
Umedmiya Rathod died in a police firing on 30.6.1985?
(2) Whether the plaintiffs prove that the police was negligent in
opening fire in the circumstances of the case?
(3)   If   the   plaintiffs   succeed   what   should   be   the   amount   of
compensation?
(4) Whether the defendant State proves that the action of opening
fire on the part of police was just and proper in the circumstances of
the case to maintain law and order?
(5) What order and award?”
8 The findings of the aforesaid issues were answered as under:
“The findings on the aforesaid issues are as under:
(1) In the affirmative.
(2) In the negative.
(3) The plaintiffs failed and hence no award.
(4) In the affirmative.
(5) As per the final order.
9 The suit, ultimately, came to be dismissed vide  judgment and
order dated 10th July 1995. The appellants herein, thereafter, filed a First
Appeal No.5952 of 1995 in this Court under Section 96 of the C.P.C. The
First Appeal came to be dismissed vide judgment and order dated 16th
March   1996.   The   learned   Single   Judge,   while   dismissing   the   First
Appeal, held as under:
“8. The first aspect which requires consideration  is based  on an admitted
fact,   in   respect   of   which   the   trial   court   has   apparently   not     devoted
sufficient   attention. However, the trial court cannot be faulted for the
simple reason that the parties have themselves not focused their attention
in  their  pleadings on this admitted fact.  It is an admitted fact that the
firing which resulted in the death of the husband of the third   plaintiff
Page 5 of 116
HC-NIC Page 5 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
was  not  a firing by the police authorities, but was a firing by the Army
contingent.    I say that this is an admitted position not     merely   on
account  of  the  recitals  made  in the judgement, but also  because  it
appears  to  be  common ground  of  the  respective parties as appearing
from the evidence on record.   Furthermore, the learned counsel for the
appellant was put this specific question  during  the  course of the hearing,
and after due deliberation, he has conceded  that  admittedly  it  was  the
Army and not the police who had actually resorted to firing.

9. The direct consequence of this admitted  fact  is that it  would  raise
many   other   issues, which may be issues   of fact and/or issues of law
and/or  mixed  issues of  facts  and  law,  which  unfortunately  have not
been raised  on account of either  defective  pleading  on  the part   of  the
plaintiffs   and/or   incomplete   and   vague evidence on the part of the
plaintiffs.  Only by  way  of illustration, I may indicate how this admitted
fact would raise  many   other   questions.    Firstly,   the  Army authorities
nor the Captain who is alleged to   have   been the head of the army
Contingent at the relevant point of time have been made party­defendants
to the suit.   Thus, they have  been  denied  an  opportunity  of  defending
themselves of  the  allegations  made  against  them  as regards negligence
and/or   non­justification   for   the firing.   If the tort feasor who is not
merely  a  proper party, but  a  necessary party in a suit for damages for
torts,  cannot   be  held  liable    for    negligence    and consequently for
damages, certainly the defendant­State of Gujarat cannot be held  liable
on  the  principle  of vicarious liability.    It goes without saying, and it is
certainly   the   plaintiffs’   case,   that   the   State   is     liable   for   the     acts
complained   of,   on   account   of   the   acts   done   by   its   officers,   agents,
subordinates,  etc.  However, since it  was  the Army which had resorted to
the firing and not the police, certainly  it  cannot  be  taken  for granted
or  assumed  that  the  Army  authorities  were servants, agents or officers
of  the  State  of  Gujarat. This would be a matter of both pleading and
evidence, and obviously there  is no evidence on record to indicate in any
manner whatsoever whether the Army  authorities  were present  on  the
spot  as  of  right,  or  whether their presence there was with a view to
assisting   the   police, or     with a view to supplant the police force, and
whether they  were  there   at   the   request   of   the   civil administration,
whether  they  were under the control of the civil administration and/or
the executive Magistrate, whether they acted independently and/or on the
judgement of the   Army   Captain   who   was   present on the spot, or
whether the Army contingent and the  Captain  were  under the  direction
and  control of the Executive Magistrate, etc.   Thus,  it  is  not  a  matter
of  assumption   or presumption (and  it  can never be so) that the State of
Gujarat   (the   sole    defendant)     would    ipso    facto    become  liable  for
damages in tort on the principle of vicarious liability in  respect  of  acts
committed  by  the  Army authority (even  if  the  Army  contingent  was
shown by evidence to have acted negligently).

Page 6 of 116
HC-NIC Page 6 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
9.1 For   an   appropriate   appreciation of  the perspective  discussed
by me hereinabive, it must be kept in mind that the case of the plaintiffs,
as   pleaded   in the plaint   and   as   sought   to   be   established   by the
evidence of the third plaintiff alleges   negligence   only to   the State of
Gujarat (the sole defendant) as vague and general entity,  without  any
specific allegation being made either against   the   Executive   Magistrate
who  was present on  the  spot and/or against the Army contingent which
actually resorted to  firing,  and/or  against  the Army Captain who was
in­charge of the Army contingent and also present   on   the   spot.    In
fact  on  a  total interpretation of the pleadings as set out in the  plaint
and as  sought to be established by the oral evidence of the  third  plaintiff,
appears  to  indicate  that   the plaintiffs have  attributed negligence to the
police and not to the Army contingent.  Thus, they  have  sought  to make
the State of Gujarat (the sole defendant) as liable on the   principle   of
vicarious   liability,  although admittedly, the evidence establishes that it
was the Army contingent which had resorted to firing.

10. As already stated hereinabove, these aspects have not been brought
on record on account of the   absence   of pleadings of   the   plaintiffs
and/or  on account of the plaintiffs  having not chosen to make the Army
authorities  party defendants   to   the   suit.       However,    no   further
comment on  my part is required except to state that the plaintiffs cannot
succeed in this case, on the ground  of negligence against  the  State  of
Gujarat  unless  the plaintiffs  first establish  that  the  person  or  entity
committing such  acts  was  under  the  authority and/or direction and/or
under the control of or was an agency of the defendant  State  of  Gujarat.
I  refer  to   this situation  only  to  point  out  that  this  is merely an
additional  ground on which the suit  is  required  to  be dismissed.

11. It must also be borne in mind that   the   suit   is for damages in
torts,  and for wrongful  acts committed  by the defendant  which  would
amount  to  negligence  and/or failing to  take necessary degree of care.
Without going into a   detailed   discussion   on   the   case   law   on   the
subject, suffice it to say that the burden of proof is on the plaintiffs   to
show  that  the defendant and/or its servants, agents, etc.  had failed to
take the  necessary care on  the  facts and circumstances of the case.  It is
equally obvious that whether sufficient care was taken or whether there
was a flagrant  abandonment  of the   duty    to take    adequate  care is
necessarily a question of fact and this bundle of facts must necessarily be
established   by the plaintiffs   by   bringing   appropriate   evidence   on
record.  It would be futile on the part  of  the  learned counsel for  the
appellant to suggest that the composite interpretation of issue no.2 and
issue no.4 would   result in each   party   being required to shoulder the
burden of proof separately in  respect  of  different  portions  or aspects of
the very same bundle of facts.

Page 7 of 116
HC-NIC Page 7 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
12. It may also be noted that the evidence on  record establishes that
the Executive Magistrate was present on the spot and at that point of
time,  as  also  the  Army Captain, when  the firing actually took place.  It
is not necessary for me to resort to the provisions  of  section 114 of  the
Evidence Act to draw a presumption that this was a an official act of a
person or a body acting in its official capacity and that therefore such
action  may  be presumed to  have  been  taken  legally, unless contrary
evidence is produced by the plaintiff. Even  otherwise, without resorting to
such a presumption, there  is incontrovertible  evidence on record that  the
two  above mentioned officers  were present on the spot, and if the firing
was resorted to by the Army, and  looking  to   the prevalent facts   and
circumstances,  and looking to the reasons for which the Army personnel
were  kept  present and  were  accompanying “Rath Yatra”, there certainly
can be a general presumption,  and  not  necessarily  on  the facts of  the
case, that if a firing was resorted to, it must have been for good and valid
reasons,  specifically for the  purpose  of  maintaining  law  and  order
and specifically for   the   purpose   of   preventing   a   larger number of
deaths   of  the  citizens   and/or   larger   damage   to  property,  both  of   its
citizens  and  belonging  to  the State.
12.1 Even   otherwise   when   a   plaintiff   files   a   suit     for   unliquidated
damages   for negligence in torts, it is for the plaintiff to prove that the
defendant was  guilty  of negligence and/or  guilty  of  non­performance
of   its minimum duty to take care.   In the context of   this   well settled
legal  position  the  plaintiff  has  failed  to establish by evidence on record,
that the Army  personnel who resorted  to  firing  were in fact guilty of
such an order of negligence.  There is no substantive evidence on record on
this aspect apart from the   bare   assertion   of the third plaintiff in her
deposition, who was inside the house and therefore not an eye­witness.

13. There  is  yet  another matter or aspect on which the suit  could
have   been   and  has   been   justifiably dismissed.    The     plaintiff   has
failed   to   lead   any substantive evidence as regards the   quantum   of
damages claimed except the bare assertion of the third plaintiff as  regards
the so­called income of the deceased and  thus there is  no  justification  for
the quantum of damages claimed. Even this assertion   of   the   so­called
income does not  lay  sufficient  foundation  for  the  quantum actually
claimed inasmuch as the   other   essential   links are missing   from   the
evidence.    In other words, mere assertion of income even if found to be
acceptable, fails on the particular facts and circumstances of the case  to
establish   sufficient  justification  for  the quantum of damages actually
claimed.

14. Learned counsel for the appellant seeks  to  rely upon a  decision of
the Supreme Court in the case of Jay Laxmi  Salt Works Ltd.  Vs.  State of
Gujarat  (1995  (1) GLH page  37).  Learned counsel for the appellants
Page 8 of 116
HC-NIC Page 8 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
relies particularly upon  the   observations   made   and   the proposition
laid down in paragraphs 11, 14 and 15 of the said decision.   Having
perused the same carefully, I  am of the  opinion that the same does not
and cannot assist the   appellants  looking  to  the  particular  facts  and
circumstances  of  the  case  and looking to the state of evidence  on record.
Needless to say, there cannot be any controversy as regards the proposition
of law  laid  down therein. However,  when  it comes to the application of
those principles to the facts of the case,  it  is  found that the   plaintiffs
have  failed  to  establish  the necessary and  essential  facts  by  way  of
appropriate evidence.

15.1 It  must  also  be  kept   in   mind   that   the observations of  the
Supreme Court in the said decision are made in the  context  of  the  scope
and  effect  of Articles 26,  36, 49 and 115 etc.  of the Limitation Act. It,
is,   therefore,   obvious     and     does     not     require over­emphasis   to
appreciate that the observations of the Supreme Court must be read in the
context of the question which was under consideration and kept confined
to  that  context.

15.2 The Supreme Court in the case of C.I.T.  Vs.  Sun Engg.   Works
(1992(4)  SCC  363) in para 39 thereof has laid  down  the  proposition,
which  is  in   itself   a proposition  of law, that the decisions of the Apex
Court  must be read, understood and applied in  the  context  of      the
specific  issue which was under consideration before the Apex Court in the
specific decision under  reference.  Thus,  observations  or  even principles
laid down by the        Supreme Court cannot be read out of   context   or
outside   the     context     of     the   specific   issue   before   that   Court   in   that
particular decision.   For  this  reason  I  am  not  inclined  to  enter  into
a   detailed   discussion of the decision sought to be relied upon by the
learned  counsel      for the appellant.

16. Learned  counsel  for  the  appellants  has  also sought to rely upon
an unreported decision  of  a  Single Judge  of  this  Court  dated  21st
August 1995 in First   Appeal No.1716 of 1995.   I have examined this
decision in  detail,  with  all  possible  emphasis  laid  thereon  by learned
counsel for the appellants, and I am nevertheless of  the  opinion  that  the
same   is   a   decision on the particular facts of that case, and does not
involve  any principle  of  law  on  account of which I am required to take
a different view.

17. Learned counsel for the appellant also   seeks   to rely   upon   a
decision  of the Allahabad  High  Court  in the case  of  Babu Singh Vs.
Champa  Devi  (AIR    1974     Allahabad    90).    He   places   particular
reliance upon the observations  made  in  para  9 of the said decision to
the effect that  negligence is  the  omission  to  do  something  which  a
reasonable   man,   guided   upon those considerations which ordinarily
regulate the conduct of human  affairs,  would  do,  or doing something
Page 9 of 116
HC-NIC Page 9 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
which is a prudent and reasonable  man would not do do.  Negligence is
not   a   question   of evidence,   but it is an inference to be drawn from
proved  facts.  Negligence is not an  absolute  term,  but  is  a relative one
and is rather a comparative term.  What may    be negligence in one case
may not be so in another.

17.1 In the context  of  the  said  decision  and  the  observations  relied
upon,  needless  to say, I entirely  agree with the fundamental proposition
laid down therein. However, in my opinion, the same  would  not  be  of
any  assistance  to  the  learned  counsel  for the appellants inasmuch as,
even going by this definition of  negligence laid  down in this decision, the
question remains to this effect viz.  “What inference can  legitimately  be
drawn from the   facts   proved   on the record of the case?”.   As already
discussed hereinabove, the paucity of evidence on record does not permit
any positive inference to be drawn as regards the alleged negligent action
of the  defendant State  of  Gujarat and/or its servants, officers, agents,
etc.  It is mere hairsplitting to say that negligence  is not  a  question  of
evidence, but is an inference to be drawn from such evidence.  To my mind,
it is obvious that first  of  all  there  must  be  proper,   adequate   and
sufficient  evidence  on  record,  before the same can be  appreciated (and
correctly appreciated in   the   light   of the appropriate law), before any
inference whatsoever can be drawn  from such evidence.  Thus, when the
trial court comes to the conclusion that the plaintiffs  have  failed to  prove
that   the defendant­State was negligent in its   action(s), the net result
and/or meaning of  the  finding is  only  that  the  evidence  on  record,
such as it is, cannot   possibly   lead   to     any     inference     that     the
defendant­State   was   guilty   of  negligence,  on  the particular facts and
circumstances of the case.

18. In the light of the aforesaid discussion I am  of the  opinion  that
the impugned judgement and decree are eminently sustainable and there is
no   justification   for       interference,   on facts or in law, in the present
appeal. This appeal is, therefore, summarily dismissed.”
10 Being   dissatisfied  with  the   judgment  and  order   passed   by  the
learned Single Judge dismissing the appeal, the present Letters Patent
Appeal was filed. There was a difference of opinion between two learned
Judges of the Division Bench. One learned Judge thought fit to affirm
the order passed by the learned Single Judge dismissing the First Appeal
holding as under:
Page 10 of 116
HC-NIC Page 10 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
20.“The   citizen   received   bullet   fired   by   Army   man   when   the   latter   was
discharging  his duty  of maintaining  law and  order and when  he was
acting under the orders of Executive Magistrate. Let us examine whether in
such a situation said act could be treated as actionable wrong in civil
court. The law on the point of ‘State Act’ and ‘Sovereign Action’ is quite
developed.
21.The Apex Court has in case of  N.Nagendra Rao and Co. Vs. State of
A.P. reported in AIR 1994 SC 2663 explained at length the concept of
‘State Act’ and ‘Sovereign Action’ as it was resorted to as defence in era of
pre­ independence and post independence. The relevant observation deserve
to be set out as under :
“23. In the modern sense the distinction between sovereign or nonsovereign
power thus does not exist. It all depends on the nature of
power and manner of its exercise. Legislative supremacy under the
Constitution arises out of constitutional provisions. The legislature
is free to legislate on topics and subjects carved out for it. Similarly,
the executive is free to implement and administer the law. A law
made by a Legislature may be bad or may be ultra vires, but since it
is an  exercise   of  legislative  power,  a person   affected  by  it  may
challenge its validity but he cannot approach a Court of law for
negligence in­ making the law. Nor can the Government in exercise
of its executive action be sued for its decision on political or policy
matters. It is in public interest that for acts performed by the State
either   in   its   legislative   or   executive   capacity   it   should   not   be
answerable  in torts.  That  would  be illogical  and impractical.  It
would be in conflict with even modern notions of sovereignty. One
of the tests to determine if the legislative or executive function is
sovereign in nature is whether the State is answerable for such
actions in Courts of law. For instance, acts such as defence of the
country, raising armed forces and maintaining it, making peace or
war,   foreign   affairs,   power   to   acquire   and   retain   territory,   are
functions   which   are   indicative   of   external   sovereignty   and   are
political in nature. Therefore, they are not amenable to jurisdiction
of ordinary Civil Court. No suit under Civil procedure Code would
lie in respect of it. The State is immune from being sued, as the
jurisdiction of the Courts in such matter is impliedly barred. 24.
But there the immunity ends. No civilized system can permit an
executive to play with the people of its country and claim that it is
entitled to act in any manner as it is sovereign. The concept of
public interest has changed with structural change in the society.
No legal or political system today can place the State above law as
it is unjust and unfair for a citizen to be deprived of his property
illegally by negligent act of officers of the State without any remedy.
From sincerity, efficiency and dignity of State as a juristic person,
propounded in Nineteenth Century as sound sociological basis for
Page 11 of 116
HC-NIC Page 11 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
State immunity the circle has gone round and the emphasis now is
more on liberty, equality and the rule of law. The modern social
thinking of progressive societies and the judicial approach is to do
away   with   archaic   State   protection   and   place   the   State   or   the
Government   at   par   with   any   other   juristic   legal   entity.   Any
watertight compartmentalization of the functions of the State as
“sovereign   and   non­sovereign”   or   “governmental   and   nongovernmental”
is not sound. It is contrary to modern jurisprudential
thinking.   The   need   of   the   State   to   have   extraordinary   powers
cannot be doubted. But with the conceptual, change of statutory
power being statutory duty for sake of society and the people the
claim of a common man or ordinary citizen cannot be thrown out
merely because it was done by an officer of the State even though it
was against law and negligently. Needs of the State, duty of its
officials and right of the citizens are required to be reconciled so
that the rule of law in a welfare  State  is not  shaken.  Even  in
America where this doctrine of sovereignty found its place either
because of the ‘financial instability of the infant American States
rather than to the stability of the doctrine theoretical foundation,’
or because of ‘logical and practical ground,’ or that ‘there could be
no legal right as against the State which made the law’ gradually
gave way to the movement  from,  ‘State  irresponsibility  to State
responsibility.’ In welfare State, functions of the State are not only
defence of the country or administration of justice or maintaining
law   and   order   but   it   extends  to  regulating   and   controlling   the
activities of people in almost every sphere, educational, commercial,
social, economic, political and even marital. The demarcating line
between sovereign and non­sovereign powers for which no rational
basis survives has largely disappeared. Therefore, barring functions
such as administration of justice, maintenance of law and order
and repression of crime etc.  which are among  the primary and
inalienable   functions   of   a   constitutional   Government,   the   State
cannot   claim   any   immunity.   The   determination   of   vicarious
liability of the State being linked with negligence of its officers, if
they   can   be   sued   personally   for   which   there   is   no   dearth   of
authority and the law of misfeasance in discharge of public duty
having marched ahead, there is no rationale for the proposition
that   even   if   the   officer   is  liable   the   State   cannot   be   sued.   The
liability of the officers personally was not doubted even in Viscount
Canterbury (supra). But the Crown was held immune on doctrine
of sovereign immunity. Since the doctrine has become outdated and
sovereignty now vests in the people, the State cannot claim any
immunity   and   if   a   suit   is   maintainable   against   the   officer
personally, then there is no reason to hold that it would not be
maintainable against the State. 25. In the light of what has been
discussed, it can well be said that the East India Company was not
a sovereign body and therefore, the doctrine of sovereign immunity
Page 12 of 116
HC-NIC Page 12 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
did not apply to the activities carried on by it in the strict sense.
Since it was a delegate of the Crown and the activities permitted
under   the   Charter   to   be   carried   on   by   it   were   impressed   with
political character, the State or its officers on its analogy cannot
claim any immunity for negligence in discharge of their statutory
duties under protective cover of sovereign immunity. The limited
sovereign power enjoyed by the Company could not be set up as
defence in any action of torts in private law by State. Since the
liability of the State even today is same as was of the East India
Company, the suit filed by any person for negligence of officers of
the State cannot  be dismissed as it was in exercise of sovereign
power. Ratio of KasturiLal (supra) is available to those rare and
limited cases where the statutory authority acts as a delegate of
such   function   for   which   it  cannot   be   sued   in  Court  of   law.   In
KasturiLal’s case the property for damages of which the suit was
filed was seized by the police officers while exercising the power of
arrest under Section 54(1)(iv) of the Criminal Procedure Code. The
power to search and apprehend a suspect under Criminal Procedure
Code is one of the inalienable powers of State. It was probably for
this   reason   that   the   principle   of   sovereign   immunity   in   the
conservative   sense   was   extended   by   the   Court.   But   the   same
principle would not be available in large number of other activities
carried   on   by   the   State   by   enacting   a   law   in   its   legislative
competence.
26. A law may be made to carry out the primary or inalienable
functions of the State. Criminal Procedure Code is one such law. A
search or seizure effected under such law could be taken to be an
exercise of power which may be in domain of inalienable function.
Whether the authority to whom this power is delegated is liable for
negligence in discharge of duties while performing such functions is
a different matter. But when similar powers are conferred under
other   statute   as   incidental   or   ancillary   power   to   carry   out   the
purpose and, objective of the Act, then it being an exercise of such
State function which is not primary or inalienable, an officer acting
negligently   is   liable   personally   and   the   State   vicariously.
Maintenance   of   law   and   order   or   repression   of   crime   may   be
inalienable function, for proper exercise of which the State may
enact a law and may delegate its functions, the violation of which
may not be sueable in torts, unless it trenches into and encroaches
on the fundamental  rights of life and liberty guaranteed by the
Constitution.   But   that   principle   would   not   be   attracted   where
similar   powers   are   conferred   on   officers   who   exercise   statutory
powers which are otherwise than sovereign powers as understood in
the modern sense. The Act deals with persons indulging in hoarding
and black­marketing. Any power for regulating and controlling the
essential commodities and the delegation of power to authorized
Page 13 of 116
HC-NIC Page 13 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
officers to inspect, search and seize the property for carrying out the
object of the State cannot be a power for negligent exercise of which
the State can claim immunity. No constitutional system can, either
on State necessity or public policy, condone negligent functioning of
the State  or its officers.  The rule was succinctly  stated by Lord
Blackburn in Geddis v. Proprietors of Bonn Reservoir (1878) 3
App Cases p. 430 at p. 435 :­
“No action will lie for doing that which the legislature has
authorized, if it be done without negligence, although it does
occasion damage to any one; but an action does lie for doing
that   which   the   Legislature   has   authorized   if   it   be   done
negligently.”
27. Matter may be examined from yet another angle. Art. 300 of
the Constitution of India is extracted below :­
“Art. 300. Suits and proceedings. ­(1) The Government of
India may sue or be sued by the name of the Union of India
and the Government of a State may sue or be sued by the
name of the State and may, subject to any provisions which
may be made by Act of Parliament or of the Legislature of
such   State  enacted  by virtue   of  powers  conferred   by this
Constitution, sue or be sued in relation to their respective
affairs in the like cases as the Dominion of India and the
corresponding Provinces or the corresponding Indian States
might have sued or been sued if this Constitution had not
been enacted.
(2) If at the commencement of this Constitution(a)
any   legal   proceedings   are   pending   to   which   the
Dominion of India is a party, the Union of India shall be
deemed   to   be   substituted   for   the   Dominion   in   those
proceedings; and
(b) any legal proceedings are pending to which a Province or
an Indian State is a party, the corresponding State shall be
deemed to be substituted for the Province or the Indian State
in those proceedings.”
In Vidhyavati (supra) it was held that this Article consisted
of three parts :
(1) that the State may sue or be sued by the name of the
State;
(2) that the State may sue or be sued in relation to its
affairs in like cases as the corresponding Provinces or the
corresponding Indian States might have sued or been sued if
this Constitution had not been enacted; and
Page 14 of 116
HC-NIC Page 14 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
(3) that the second part is subject to any provisions which
may   be   made   by   an   Act   of   the   Legislature   of   the   State
concerned,   in   due   exercise   of   its   legislative   functions,   in
pursuance of powers conferred by the Constitution.
In Vidhyawati (supra) and Kasturi Lal (supra) it was held
that since no law had been framed by the Legislature, the
liability of the State to compensate for negligence of officers
was to be decided on general principle. In other words, if a
competent   Legislature   enacts   a   law   for   compensation   or
damage for any act done by it or its officers in discharge of
that statutory duty then a suit for it would be maintainable.
It has been explained earlier that the Act itself provides for
return   of   the   goods   if   they   are   not   confiscated   for   any
reason. And if the goods cannot be returned for any reason
then   the   owner   is   entitled   for   value   of   the   goods   with
interest.
23.The Apex Court has in case of Smt. Nilabati Behera Vs.State of Orissa
reported in AIR 1993 SC 1960 emphatically reiterated that when in a
question of infringement of the fundamental rights, especially under Article
21 and 14 the plea of ‘Stater action’ and ‘Sovereign Immunity’ would pale
into insignificance. Thus when a citizen is claiming violation of his rights
under Article 21 of the Constitution of India the action based thereon
would not be defeated only on the spacious pleas of ‘State Action ‘ or
Sovereign immunity.
24.The complaint of breach of Article 21 and actionable wrong based thereon
need not be brought only in realm of and as remedy in public law but it
could  be enforced  also  under  the provisions  of private  law by way  of
bringing  suit in civil  court  for  tortuous  act  of  State  or its agent  and
servant, as Section 9 of the CPC do not specifically bar any claim based
upon any rights including fundamental rights. Thus a citizen has right
either to resort to public law remedy of filing a writ petition or filing a civil
suit in competent court but in that case the suit is to be tried as if it was
brought   for   enforcing   rights   and   seeking   redress   in   accordance   with
provisions of the Civil Procedure Code and the plaintiff citizen would be
under obligation to prove the negligence or tortuous act of State or its
servant in accordance with the provisions of civil procedure code and he
would be bound by the rigors of Evidence Act as well.
25.The   Apex   Court   has   observed   in   case   of  Sube   Singh   Vs.   State   of
Hariyana reported in AIR 2006 SC 1117 as under:
20. Cases where violation of Article 21 involving custodial death or
torture  is established  or is incontrovertible  stand  on a different
footing when compared to cases where such violation is doubtful or
Page 15 of 116
HC-NIC Page 15 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
not established. Where there is no independent evidence of custodial
torture   and   where   there   is   neither   medical   evidence   about   any
injury   or   disability,   resulting   from   custodial   torture,   nor   any
mark/scar, it may not be prudent to accept claims of human right
violation, by persons having criminal records in a routine manner
for awarding compensation. That may open the floodgates for false
claims, either to mulct money from the State or as to prevent or
thwart   further   investigation.   Courts   should,   therefore,   while
jealously   protecting   the   fundamental   rights   of   those   who   are
illegally   detained   or  subjected   to   custodial   violence,  should   also
stand guard against false, motivated and frivolous claims in the
interests of the society and to enable Police to discharge their duties
fearlessly and effectively. While custodial torture is not infrequent,
it should be borne in mind that every arrest and detention does not
lead to custodial torture.
21. In cases where custodial death or custodial torture or other
violation of the rights guaranteed under Article 21 is established,
courts may award compensation in a proceeding under Article 32
or 226. However, before awarding compensation, the Court will
have   to   pose   to   itself   the   following   questions:(a)   Whether   the
violation of Article 21 is patent and incontrovertible, (b) whether
the violation is gross and of a magnitude to shock the conscience of
the court, (c) whether the custodial torture alleged has resulted in
death or whether custodial torture is supported by medical report
or visible marks or scars or disability. Where there is no evidence of
custodial torture of a person except his own statement, and where
such allegation is not supported by any medical report or other
corroboration evidence, or where there are clear indications that
the allegations are false or exaggerated fully or in part, courts may
not award compensation as a public law remedy under Article 32
or 226, but relegate the aggrieved party to the traditional remedies
by way of appropriate civil/criminal action.
26.Now in the light of the aforesaid discussion now let us examine as to what
extent the plaintiffs proved the case of patent negligence and carelessness
on the part of the State and the Army­man in opening fire and causing
death of the husband of the plaintiff no. 3.
27.It is required to be noted at this stage that plaintiffs have chosen to take
out  remedy  under   Section  9 of  the  Code  of Civil  Procedure   and  have
claimed   that   damages,   which   they   sustained   on   account   of   death   of
deceased Umedmiya Rathod, husband of plaintiff no. 3, as a result of
bullet injury fired by army man posted by the State for maintaining law
and order situation. The Act of tort of negligence and carelessness on the
agent is pleaded for fastening the liability on principal or in other words,
Page 16 of 116
HC-NIC Page 16 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the alleged negligence and reckless act of servant is sought to be made
subject matter of claim for damages from the master in the suit. The trial
Court has framed the following issues and answered as under:
ISSUES:
(1) Whether the plaintiffs prove that the deceased Gulam Rasul
Umedmiya Rathod died in a police firing on 30.6.1985?
(2) Whether the plaintiffs prove that the police was negligent in
opening fire in the circumstances of the case?
(3)   If   the   plaintiffs   succeed   what   should   be   the   amount   of
compensation?
(4) Whether the defendant State proves that the action of opening
fire on the part of police was just and proper in the circumstances of
the case to maintain law and order?
(5) What order and award?
The findings on the aforesaid issues are as under:
(1) In the affirmative.
(2) In the negative.
(3) The plaintiffs failed and hence no award.
(4) In the affirmative.
(5) As per the final order.
28.The   trial   Court   has   discussed   issued   Nos.   1,2   and   4   together   in   its
judgment. The trial Court has came to the conclusion that State cannot be
said to have been in any way negligent and plaintiffs have failed to prove
that the State agency had not exercised statutory powers honestly and in
good   faith.   The   State   agency   acted   while   discharging   their   statutory
functions which ultimately are referable to base on the delegation of the
sovereign powers of the State.
29.In these set of evidence, one needs to be mindful that plaintiffs were under
duty to make out their own case as per their pleadings in the plaint. It is
indeed unfortunate that the plaintiffs have chosen not to join concerned
military  man,  who opened  fire or whose bullet hit the plaintiff  no.3’s
husband, which resulted into sad demise. The non­joinder of the party in
absence of any specific objection, is required to be viewed from the aspect
of plaintiffs lacuna in proving their case, as the plaintiffs have not rested
their case only on State being vicariously liable on account of act of firing
on the part of its servant and agent, in the instant case, as could be seen
from   the   trial   Court’s   judgment   and   decree,   the   army   personnel   were
posted at the behest of State in a sensitive area where the procession was
to pass, which was surrounded by Muslim inhabitants and therefore, it
cannot be said that army or army personnel were not under the control of
the State but a question arises that can this in itself be sufficient to rope in
State as a vicariously liable for death of the husband of plaintiff no. 3. As
Page 17 of 116
HC-NIC Page 17 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
it depend upon various factors discussed hereinabove, the State has taken
a different stand in its written statement, which, in view of this Court,
could be said to be a definite admission qua plaintiffs’ claim that husband
of plaintiff no. 3 died during riot or during the firing, that took place on
Jordan   Road   on   30.6.1985.   As   against   this,   it  can   well  be   said  that
plaintiffs have not rested their case that they are entitled for claiming
damaged   on   account   of   only   filing,   they   have   gone   ahead   and
unequivocally pleaded and attempted to prove by leading evidence that
there was uncontrolled and reckless firing aimed at killing the resident of
surrounding area, which resulted into death of husband of plaintiff no. 3.
Now when such specific plea is made, than, it was the burden lying upon
the plaintiffs to prove it. In other words, when the State was consciously
admitting the firing of five rounds during the time, which resulted into
death of husband of plaintiff no. 3 and when such circumstances is pleaded
and it is stated that the firing was done after giving due warning by the
Executive Magistrate, in absence of any cogent evidence, showing contrary,
it can well be said that written statement of the State cannot be partly
accepted and partly brushed aside. Learned advocate for the State has
therefore,  rightly  submitted  that  the case of the plaintiffs  is otherwise
taken upon the written statement to prove that the incident of firing is
admitted by the State and death of husband of plaintiff no. 3 during firing
is also admitted by the State. Otherwise, it was bounden duty cast upon
the plaintiffs to prove the death by leading cogent evidence and therefore,
when  plaintiffs   had relied  upon  the  written  statement   of  the  State  in
respect of firing and death of of husband of plaintiff no. 3 during that
firing,   than,   the   rest   of   the   statement,   that   the   firing   was   absolutely
necessary and it was warranted for saving life and liberty and saving
damages   to   property   and   that   it   was   done   only   after   the   executive
magistrate on the spot ordered it to be done, etc, were required to be
rebutted   by   the   plaintiff   by   leading   cogent   evidence.   The   said   written
statement could not have been brushed aside by the learned trial Court,
the learned trial Court has therefore, come to the conclusion that State has
established that firing was warranted and there was no excess in resorting
to fire. The amount of round fired looking to entire situation also go to
support the case of the State.
30.Thus, from the evidence on record, it can well be said that the incident of
death of husband of plaintiff no. 3, which occurred in firing, had not been
on account of any overt action of enmity or over stepping of authority or
deliberate action on killing someone. The court need to be mindful of the
proposition of law that before holding the State responsible or vicariously
liable for its servants or agents acts the vary act is required to be proved to
be palpably and so imminently wrong as to give cause of action to the
aggrieved. In the instant case, as it is seen, the plaintiffs have not proved,
though attempted to plead a case of deliberate action on the part of the
army to victimize particular community residing in that area. The facts
pleaded by the plaints themselves go to show that the unfortunate victim
Page 18 of 116
HC-NIC Page 18 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
had gone to roof top of his neighbor, in other words, the victim has in fact
gone out of his residence and on the roof top his neighbor during the time
when the entire area was under curfew. When the Curfew was imposed
and   Army   personnel   were   deployed   for   maintaining   law   and   order
situation   and   when   the   procession   was   passing   through   the   area,   the
unfortunate incident occurred. In these set of circumstance it was duty cast
upon the plaintiffs to prove beyond doubt that the firing was resorted to
without it being warranted and that no special care required under these
circumstances were not taken by the State. In absence of such proof the
Trial Court had no option but to dismiss the suit.
31.The question arises as to whether for such an act, which also amount to
act of offence, for which obviously State would not authorize its officer,
can State be held responsible?. The Court while holding State responsible
in such a situation, has to come to a specific conclusion that act was in
discharge   of   official   duty   and   hence,   it   was   thus   rendering   the   State
vicariously liable for the same.
32.Looking to the aforesaid facts and circumstances of the case and the fact
that looking to attending circumstances five round of firing were taken
place and looking to fact that Jordan Road area is popular for such acts
and sensitive area, go to show that firing was not unjustifiable as a result
thereof   unfortunate   incident   of   death   has   occurred,   to   which,   though
sympathy would flow, the claim under the law of tort cannot be accepted.
The authorities cited by learned advocate for the appellants have not been
of any avail to the facts and circumstances  of the case on hand. It is
required to be noted that non­joinder of the concerned army­man, who
opened fire, can be said to be lacuna on the part of the plaintiffs and
learned Single Judge’s observation on this ground cannot be said to be in
any way contrary to law so as to call for any interference.
33. The Learned Single Judge has elaborately discussed these as aspect.
Therefore, the order passed by the trial Court as well as learned Single
Judge needs no interference and the Letters Patent Appeal fails and is
hereby rejected.”
11 Another  learned  Judge   thought   fit  to  allow  the   Letters  Patent
Appeal and decreed the suit holding as under:
5. “Right   to   life   to   any   citizen   guaranteed   under   Article   21   of   the
Constitution   does   provide   no   deprivation   of   life   except   according   the
procedure prescribed by law. It is hardly required to be stated that in the
matter where the liberty or life of the citizen is involved, it is necessary for
Page 19 of 116
HC-NIC Page 19 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the officers to act with the expectation and strict compliance  with the
mandatory provisions of law, as it is not permissible in such cases to take a
liberal or generous view of the lapses on the part of the officers. Reference
may be made to the decision of the Apex Court in the case of Hem Lall
Bhandari Vs. State of Sikkim reported in AIR 1987 SC 762.
6. The courts of the country have to render enough zeal to safeguard right to
life of any citizen and any lenient approach on the part of the Court to
leave room for a casual or cavalier approach on the part of the State or
any of its officer would result into failure on the part of the Court to
discharge its obligation with which the power is so vested in the judiciary
by the constitution of the country. The Court would be zealous to protect
and   guard   the   fundamental   rights   of   life   of   every   citizen   unless   the
deprivation by the State or its officer is strictly in accordance with the
procedure prescribed by law. If the life of any citizen has been deprived by
the State or its officers, heavy burden would lie upon the State to prove
that   the   procedure   prescribed   by   law   for  deprivation  of   such  life   was
strictly followed and in absence thereof, any laxity on the part of the State
should and must result into appropriate compensation for the lapse on the
part of the State or its officers. The matter cannot be looked at from the
point   of   alleged   technicalities   to   join   the   concerned   officer,   who   has
deprived of the life to any citizen when the State itself has admitted that
the life was lost in the police firing. It would be for the State prove by
cogent material establishing that it is on account of the maintenance of
law and order situation after taking all care and caution as was required,
the unfortunate incident has happened. Any casual or cavalier approach
on   the   part   of   the   State   can   neither   be   leniently   viewed   nor   can   be
countenanced by the Court, but on the contrary, such approach not only
deserves   to   be   deprecated   strongly,   but   should   result   into   heavy
compensation for deprivation of the life to the citizen.
7. It is not a matter where the State is clothed with the power to take away
the life of a citizen while maintaining law and order situation, but the life
of a citizen may be lost if all proper care and cautions are taken by the
concerned officers of the State for maintenance of law and order situation
and the death of the citizen was the consequence thereof. Any attempt to
style deprivation of the life of any citizen by any officer of the State cannot
be accepted either on a mere ipsi dixit nor on any mere pleading without
their being any proof of it. If the State was to prove that on account of
stone throwing on the police or the army, the firing was a must, then it
was required for the State to first prove that there was stone throwing. It
was also required for the State to prove that after the stone throwing had
started, proper warning was given to the mob. It was also required for the
State to prove that inspite of the proper warning, the activity of stone
throwing did not end. It was also required for the State to prove that
thereafter,   the   permission   of   the   Executive   Magistrate   was   taken   for
opening police firing and it was also required for the State to prove that
Page 20 of 116
HC-NIC Page 20 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the police firing was opened in the manner to prevent the mob from stone
throwing and not for targeting the bullet so as to take away the life of the
citizen. It is undisputed position that neither any documentary evidence is
produced whatsoever nor any officer of the State has entered the witness
box, may be police officer or the Executive Magistrate who had authority
to grant permission for opening police firing. Under these circumstances, if
the State has rested itself by just filing written statement, the approach on
the part of the trial court to dismiss the suit that too by recording the
finding that issue no.2 was not proved, in spite of the fact that the wife of
the deceased had entered the witness box and she stood by the pleadings
narrated   in   the   plaint   even   after   her   cross­examination   and   that   the
finding of issue no.4 in affirmative in spite of the fact that no officer of the
State entered the witness box for proving the fact of the defences raised in
the written statement or for proving the fact for following strict procedure
for opening of police firing and consequently resulting into deprivation of
the life of the deceased, in my view can be said to be ex facie perverse
approach on the part of the trial court while protecting the right of the
citizen   of   the   country   for   right   to   life   and   consequently,   granting
exemption   to   the   State   and   its   officers   from   its   liability   to   pay
compensation.
8. The aforesaid is coupled with the important aspect that permission for
procession   of   Chariot   of   Lord   Jagannathji   was   not   granted   by   the
competent authority. It is while protecting such procession of chariot of
lord   Jagannathji,   the   police   and   the   army   were   deployed   and   the
unfortunate incident happened of deprivation of the life to the citizen. At
the same time, it is true that the curfew was imposed in the area, but even
if   such   was   the   position,   the   breach   of   curfew   would   not   result   into
authorising the State or its officers to take away the life of the citizen
unless there were orders of shoot at sight which was not even the case
pleaded in the written statement by way of defence on behalf of the State.
9. The learned Single Judge of this Court in the First Appeal unfortunately
gave undue weightage to the deployment of the army and consequently,
leading to record the finding of non­joinder of necessary parties. As such, it
was not a case even pleaded by the State that the whole area of the route
for the procession of chariot of Lord Jagannathji was entrusted to the
army but the case pleaded in the written statement by way of defence was
that the army was deployed to assist the State and that is the reason why
the pleadings were made in the written statement for the permission of the
Executive Magistrate. Had the area entrusted to army, the permission of
the Commandant of the army would be required, but in a case where the
State   has   requisitioned   army   for   assistance   of   the   State   Police   or   for
maintenance of the law and order in certain area of the State, the officers
of the army or the members of the armed force would be acting on and
behalf of the State Government who has so requisitioned the services of the
army and that was the reason why the pleadings are made in the written
Page 21 of 116
HC-NIC Page 21 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
statement   for   the   permission   granted   by   the   Executive   Magistrate.
Therefore, when the members of the armed forces have acted under the
permission of the Executive Magistrate, it was not a case where the suit
could be thrown away just on the ground that the concerned officer of the
army was not joined as the party or otherwise. A citizen who has lost his
life or relative of the citizen who has suffered agony may not be knowing
the name of the member of the armed force who opened firing under the
permission of the officers of the State Government,  but the burden as
observed earlier, even as per the issues framed by the trial court and even
as per the pleadings as well as constitutional mandate of Article 21 was
upon the State to disclose the name and to establish that the procedure as
prescribed for deprivation of the life was strictly followed.
15.The aforesaid observations and discussions lead me to record the following
conclusion
1. On behalf of the plaintiff, a case was pleaded in the plaint and the
evidence in support thereof was produced in the plaint for wrongful
deprivation of the life of the deceased resulting into the consequence
of liability on the part of the State to pay the compensation.
2. The   State   admitted   the   incident   in   the   written   statement   and
pleaded   certain   defences   but   led   no   evidence   whatsoever   by
examining   any   of   its   officers   nor   produced   any   documentary
evidence whatsoever in support of the defences raised in the written
statement.
3. The plaintiff had satisfactorily discharged the burden upon it for
proving issue no.2 in affirmative.
4. The defendant had failed to discharge the burden of proving issue
no.4 in its favour.
5. The approach on the part of the State of not leading any evidence
whatsoever   in   support   of   the   defence   pleaded   in   the   written
statement and after framing of issue no.4 could be said as casual,
cavalier in prosecuting the defences in the suit for compensation.
6. The Trial Court failed to consider the basic aspect that the right to
life guaranteed to any citizen under article 21 of the constitution is
to be zealously guarded and to be enforced, unless the State or its
officer by strict proof establishes that the deprivation of the life was
through the procedure established by law.
7. The burden of proving the following of the procedure established by
law for deprivation of the life of the citizen as per the constitutional
Page 22 of 116
HC-NIC Page 22 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
mandate as well as per the Evidence Act and Civil Procedure Code
after framing of the issue, was upon the State for which it failed.
8. The   principles   of   proof   beyond   reasonable   doubt   has   no
applicability if the matter is to be considered for the purpose of
awarding of compensation, but in a matter of deprivation of life of
any   citizen   by   and   or   its   officers,   the   burden   of   proving   the
procedure followed in accordance with law would be upon the State
either itself or through its officers who are representing the State.
9. Deployment of army for maintenance of law and order situation
was to assist the State upon the requisition of the State. When the
army is working under the instructions of the Executive Magistrate
who is an officer of the State, it cannot be said as an action of the
army under its military power, but can be said as its operation on
behalf of State and the State would be liable for compensation for
any   lapse   on   the   part   of   any   member   of   the   armed   forces   so
deployed for the purpose of maintenance of law and order situation
unless the whole area is entrusted by the State to the army under
its full control of its military power.
10.When   the   State   is  joined   as   party   in  the   proceedings   and   the
compensation is prayed from the State, who is represented through
the Secretary of the State of Gujarat, Home Department of the State
Government, it cannot be said that the suit would fail on account of
non­joinder of necessary part, more particularly when no such issue
was even framed by the Trial Court for such purpose.
11.No   arguments   are   advanced   on   the   question   of   quantum   of
compensation nor pleaded in the defence. As per the evidence on
behalf of the plaintiff that her husband was earning Rs.700/­ to
Rs.750/­ per month in the business could be said as sufficient for
awarding of the compensation as prayed of Rs.90,000/­. However,
the interest rate of 18% p.a. is excessive and the reasonable interest
would be of 7% p.a from the date of the suit until the amount is
realised by the plaintiff.
16.In view of the aforesaid, the judgement and the decree for dismissal of the
suit and  its confirmation  thereof  by the learned  Single  Judge  in First
Appeal, in my view deserves to be quashed and set aside by allowing the
suit with the decree of the compensation of Rs.90,000/­ with interest at
the rate of 7% p.a. from the date of the suit until the amount is realised
and consequently, the appeal deserves to be allowed with the cost and the
decree is required to be drawn accordingly.
17.Hence, with respect, I do not concur with the view taken by my brother
(S.R. Brahmbhatt, J.) for dismissal of the appeal, but my ultimate view is
Page 23 of 116
HC-NIC Page 23 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
to allow the appeal as observed hereinabove.”
“Further Order :
In view of the aforesaid disagreement by both of us, office is directed to
place the matter before the Hon’ble the Chief Justice for placing the matter
before   the   appropriate   Court   after   obtaining   suitable   orders   from   the
Hon’ble the Chief Justice on administrative side.”
12 In view of the conflict, this appeal has been placed before me as a
third Judge.
13 Mr. A.J. Memon, the learned counsel appearing for the appellants
submitted that the right to life is one of the basic human rights. It is
guaranteed to every person by Article 21 of the Constitution and not
even the State has the authority to violate that right. He would submit
that the doctrine of sovereign immunity, as pleaded by the State in its
defence, is subject to the constitutional mandate enjoining a duty on the
State not to deprive any person of his life or personal liberty except
without following the procedure established by law. The learned counsel
submitted that when a person is deprived of his fundamental right to life
or personal liberty, except according to the procedure established by
law, by police and the wrong done is actionable, the State is responsible
for such deprivation caused by a wrongful act committed by a member
of the police force of the Union. According to the learned counsel, the
Army was deployed in the city upon the request made by the State
Government   to   the   Union   in   the   wake   of   the   tension   which   was
prevailing at that point of time. The Executive Magistrate was put incharge.
In such circumstances, he would be taking the decision whether
to ask the military personnels to open fire or not. Mr. Memon submitted
that the State, except filing the written statement, failed to lead any oral
evidence in support of its defence. He would submit that when a party to
the suit does not appear in the witness box and states his own case on
Page 24 of 116
HC-NIC Page 24 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
oath and does not offer himself to be cross­examined by the other side, a
presumption would arise that the case set up by him is not correct. The
averments made in the written statement on oath would not constitute a
legal evidence. In such circumstances, the Court has to accept the case
put up by the plaintiff. Mr. Memon would submit that the averments
made   in   the   written   statement   would   constitute   a   legal   evidence
provided the same is a neat question of law or that the facts are such
that the Court can take judicial notice under Sections 56 and 57 of the
Evidence Act. Mr. Memon submits that the liability would be of the State
Government, as the incident occurred in the State of Gujarat and the
firing was opened pursuant to the orders of the Executive Magistrate.
14 In such circumstances referred to above, Mr. Memon prays that
the suit deserves to be decreed in favour of the plaintiff.
15 On the other hand, this appeal has been vehemently opposed by
Mr. Maulik Nanavati, the learned A.G.P. for the State. Mr. Nanavati has
filed his written submissions. The submissions read as under:
“Case of the plaintiff as contained in plaint and evidence led by plaintiff
The relevant averments in the plaint, translated into English, would read
as under:
(a) Military without any prior warning, without any justifiable cause and
without  making  any preparation  to maintain peace  opened  fire in an
arbitrary manner. Further, the way in which firing was done indicates
that military in a totally careless manner and with an intention to kill the
residents of the locality did the firing.
(b) Military men in a manner which would encourage miscreants in their
intention and conduct of seeking communal revenge opened fire by aiming
at only Muslims and because of such firing by the military death of father
of plaintiff has taken place and with the result that for such criminal at
person responsible for it is liable.
(c) Military men were behaving in any arbitrary and brazenly negligent
Page 25 of 116
HC-NIC Page 25 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
manner   and   yet   the   State   did   not   make   any   attempt   to   stop   them.
Therefore,   the   State   Government   is   responsible   for   the   monetary   loss
caused to the plaintiffs.
A reading of the plaint would reveal that the case of plaintiffs is that the
military indirectly encouraged the miscreants to seek communal revenge
and   afterwards   opened   fire   without   any   justifiable   reason   and   in   an
arbitrary   and   absolutely   negligent   fashion   towards   persons   of   Muslim
community and thus killed the father of the plaintiffs, and that the person
who killed their father committed a criminal act. The plaint does not state
that the army men opened fire, in discharge of their duty or under colour
of   their   office,   with   a   view   to   control   the   rioting   mob   and   prevent
worsening of law and other situation. It is also not pleaded that military
opened fire under instructions of the officers of the State Government. The
only case pleaded is that the military personnel were acting as persons of
the State Government and, therefore, the State Government is liable for
the act of killing the plaintiff’s father.
It is settled that the plaintiff cannot plead a case which is contrary to his
pleadings. The plaintiff has not led and cannot lead evidence which is
contrary to the case as pleaded in the plaint.  The evidence led by the
plaintiff is that curfew was imposed in the area, that all the residents of
the locality were inside their house and the husband of plaintiff no.3 had
at the relevant time gone to the roof of their house for drying mattress.
There   was   no   pelting  of   stones   on  the   police   from   their  locality.   The
military had not given any prior warning before opening fire. The military
aimed at persons and thereby killed their father.
Non­joinder of necessary party – suit must fail. (CPC – Order 1, Rule 9
proviso)
The   allegations   in   the   plaint   and   the   evidence   led   in   support   of   the
pleadings are against the military. The accusation is that the military
without  any justifiable  reason and without  following  proper procedure
arbitrarily  and  indiscriminately  opened  fire,  and  not  that  they  did so
acting in discharge of their official duty or purported discharge of their
duty. As per the averments in the plaint, they were acting of their own
volition and not according to law. It is submitted that plaintiffs having
pleaded such a case it was absolutely necessary for the plaintiffs to join the
person responsible for firing towards their father and killing him as a
party defendant in the suit. Yet, the army man who fired at the father of
plaintiffs or other responsible of the military stationed in the area has not
been made a party respondent. In absence of such a party no adverse
finding   could   be   recorded   against   it   and   the   State   cannot   be   made
responsible for the act of such party. Such necessary party not having been
made defendant in the suit, the suit deserved to fail as rightly held by the
learned Single Judge.
Page 26 of 116
HC-NIC Page 26 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Defence of State Government
The State has filed a written statement stating that curfew was imposed in
the area and military was posted to maintain law and order. During the
rath yatra procession there was pelting of stones from the direction of
Jammadar Mohalla on the military  and the law and order situation had
so worsened that to control the state of affairs the military after taking
approval of the Executive Magistrate who was present there opened fire to
regain command of the situation. It is further averred that the military
fired 5 rounds and it was in that firing that the father of plaintiff’s died.
Admission – Evidentiary value
And averment in a written statement is not evidence, unless it is in the
nature of admission. Here, there is admission on the part of the State that
father of plaintiff’s died in military firing which was opened after approval
from the Executive Magistrate and because the situation prevailing at the
moment   demanded   resorting   to   firing   to   control   the   law   and   order
situation. Now it is settled law that admission has to be accepted as a
whole  and  in its entirety.  (Dudh Nath Pandey vs. Suresh Chandra
Bhattasali­ (1986) 3 SCC 360). A written statement is not a pleading in
confession and avoidance whereby a defendant is bound by the confession
and   compelled   to   prove   the   avoidance;   if   used   as   evidence   against   a
defendant,   the   whole   statement   must   be   taken   together.   If   a   written
statement contains an admission of certain facts which are favourable to
the plaintiff but contains a denial of other facts favourable to him or an
assertion of other facts which are unfavourable, the plaintiff must, if he
wants to avail himself of the admission, take not only the first set of facts
as truly stated, but also the second set of facts.  If the plaintiff is not
prepared   to   take   both,   he   would   have   to   prove   his   case   on   his   own
pleadings   and   strength.  (Fateh   Chand   Murlidhar   vs.   Juggilal
Kamlapat   –   AIR   1955   Cal   465). If   the   written   statement   and   the
admission contained therein are accepted as a whole then the State has
clearly made out a case that the firing was done because there was pelting
of stones on the police and the situation required opening fire and that it
was done after taking approval of the Magistrate.  It is submitted that
under the circumstances the said act can neither be said to be negligent or
unnecessary and for which the State can be held liable. The plaintiff has
thus failed to prove the case of negligence and the tortious liability of the
State. This submission is made without prejudice to the contention of the
State that in view of the said averment in the written statement it was not
necessary  for it to lead evidence  in support  of it as it was admission
regarding the circumstances in which the firing was done.
But for the admission by the State in its written statement that the father
of plaintiffs died in firing by the military, there is nothing on record to
Page 27 of 116
HC-NIC Page 27 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
establish   that   their   father   died   because   of   negligence   in  firing   by   the
military. Therefore, if the written statement filed by the State is excluded,
then the plaintiff has miserably failed to make out a case of negligent
firing by the military and that while doing so the military was acting in
discharge of its duty. On the contrary, the plaintiff’s pleading and evidence
is that the persons who fired were acting of their own volition and in
complete disregard of law and that the State made no attempt to stop
them from acting in such manner. In that view of the matter, the State
cannot be held vicariously liable for the individual act of the army man.
Doctrine of sovereign immunity
Assuming that the evidence led by plaintiffs is believable still it does not
make out a case of tort for which the State of Gujarat can be held liable
for   damages.   To   hold   the   State   vicariously   liable   for   the   acts   of   its
servants, it is necessary for the plaintiff to establish that the death was
caused because of negligence of an officer of the State acting in discharge
of   his   official   duty   or   under   colour   of   his   office.   Only   after   it   is   so
established can the question of State being vicariously liable for examined.
An   act   which   gives   rise   to   a  claim   for   damages,   if  committed   by   an
employee   of   the   State   during   the   course   of   his   employment,   and   if
employment   belongs   to   a   category   which   can   claim   the   special
characteristic of sovereign power, the claim cannot be sustained. There
would be no tortious liability of the State for an act performed by its
servant   in   discharge   of   a   sovereign   function.   As   held   in   a   series   of
judgments of the Hon’ble Supreme  Court, functions such as making of
laws,   administration   of   justice,   maintenance   of   law   and   order   and
repression of crime, carrying on of war, making of treaties of peace and
other consequential functions, etc. are among the primary and inalienable
functions   of   a   constitutional   government,   and   the   State   can   claim
immunity on account of sovereign function of the State.
It is true that where an account of tortious act of the servant of a State, a
person’s fundamental right to life and liberty is violated, the Courts grant
damages and compensation to that person. However, such liability is based
on the provisions of the Constitution of India and is a new liability which
is  not   hedged   by   any   limitations   including   the   doctrine   of   “Sovereign
immunity”. In the present case, the plaintiff has not invoked powers of the
Court   under   Article   226   of   the   Constitution   alleging   violation   of   law
fundamental  right but has on the contrary filed a suit in private law
complaining  of tort and seeking  compensation  on account  of vicarious
liability of State for the allegedly negligent act of its servant. Therefore, the
defense of doctrine of sovereign immunity would be available to the State
in the present case, both in law and on facts. (See: Nilabati Behera vs.
State of Orissa – (1993) 2 SCC 746; N. Nagendra Rao & Co. vs. State
of A.P. ­ (1994) 6 SCC 205; Common Cause vs. Union of India –
Page 28 of 116
HC-NIC Page 28 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
(1999) 6 SCC 667).
Therefore, in the alternative, it is submitted that assuming it is found that
the military was acting in discharge of its official duty and on instructions
of the State, even then the State cannot be held to be vicariously liable as
the said act of the military was done by it in discharge of a sovereign
function.
Conclusion
For each of these reasons, viewed individually or collectively, the claim of
the plaintiffs deserves to be rejected. The judgment of the Trial Court as
confirmed by the learned Single Judge of this Hon’ble Court deserves to be
confirmed, either for the reasons contained in those judgments or even
independently for reasons mentioned herein above, and the present appeal
is liable to be dismissed.”
16 Having heard the learned counsel appearing for the parties and
having considered the materials on record, the only question that falls
for my consideration is whether the suit is liable to be decreed and an
appropriate compensation should be awarded in favour of the plaintiffs.
●     SOVEREIGN IMMUNITY:
17 Let me first deal with the issue of sovereign immunity raised on
behalf of the State.
18 In England the immunity of the Crown from liability for a tort was
based on the maxim : ‘The King can do no wrong’. Ours is a sovereign
socialist secular democratic republic and Article 21 of our Constitution
protects the life and liberty of the citizens, except according to procedure
established by law. In cases where this guaranteed right is invaded or
infringed, may be by the State or by another citizen or body, an action
lies   under   law   for   proper   remedy.   No   doubt   Article   300(1)   of   the
Constitution renders immunity to the State against an action, if there is
any law made clothing such immunity. It is not in dispute that so far
Page 29 of 116
HC-NIC Page 29 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
neither this State nor the Parliament has legislated any law by virtue of
the powers under Clause (1) of Article 300. However, there does lie no
action   if   the   act   complained   of   is   one   committed   in   discharge   of
‘sovereign   functions’   since   actions   in   accordance   with   the   procedure
established   by   law   are   immune   and   excepted   from   the   protection
guaranteed by Article 21 as regards the life and liberty of a citizen.
●     SOVEREIGN FUNCTIONS:
19 Sovereign functions are those actions of the State for which it is
not answerable before the Court of Law. Matters such as defense of the
country,   raising   and   maintaining   armed   forces,   making   peace   in
retaining   territory,   are   functions   which   are   indicative   of   external
sovereignty and are not amenable to jurisdiction of ordinary civil Court.
Sovereign functions are primarily inalienable functions, which the State
only could exercise. The State is engaged with various functions, but all
of them cannot be construed as primary inalienable functions. Taxation,
eminent domain and police functions including maintenance of law and
order, legislative functions, administration of law, grant of pardon could
be found as the sovereign functions of the State. In the modern sense,
the distinction between sovereign or non sovereign power does not suit.
It depends upon the nature of the power and the manner of its exercise.
20 Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co. vs. Secretary of
State for India [(1868­69) 5 Bom HCR App.1], was the historical case
which had drawn the principle of sovereign and non sovereign functions
of the Government while deciding the extent of liability and immunity of
the State. The Supreme Court of Calcutta held that the Secretary of State
is liable only for the extent of commercial functions and not liable for
anything done in exercise of sovereign powers. The dichotomy theory of
Page 30 of 116
HC-NIC Page 30 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
“Sovereign and Non Sovereign functions determined by the Court in
Peninsular  case helped the judiciary to interpret the functions of the
government when the question of liability of State arose. But there is no
uniform and static norm to decide the sovereign functions. The following
judicial   interpretations   are   given   by   the   Courts   in   various   cases   as
sovereign   functions   to   exempt   the   State   from   liability.   When   the
functions of the State are carried out by its servants under the provisions
of the State the State is not responsible to pay compensation for the
wrongful acts of its servants.
●     PERFORMANCE OF STATUTORY DUTY
21 There   is   no   yardstick   to   measure   to   what   extent   the   State   is
immune from  liability  for the  wrongful acts of  servants of State. In
Shivbhajan Durga Prasad  vs.  Secretary of State  [ILR 28 Bom. 314
(1904)], certain bundles of hay were negligently attached by the Chief
constable of Mahim, the petitioner was arrested and prosecuted, later he
was   acquitted   by   the   Court.   He   sued   the   Secretary   of   State   for
compensation for the negligence of the constable. It was held that the
Secretary of State was not liable for damages on account of the negligence of
a Chief Constable, with regard to  goods seized not in obedience to an
order of the executed government, but in  performance of a statutory
power vested in him.  Gurucharan kaur  vs.  Province of Madras [AIR
1980 SC 1362], was another case where a Sub. Inspector of Police,
acting under a bona – fide, though erroneous belief that he was to detain
Maharani of Nabha and wrongfully confined her. Concerning the claim
of Compensation, the Government was held not liable, as the police
officers   have   taken   the   action   in   pursuance   of   statutory   duty   even
though under a mistaken view. A statutory duty was thus clothed with a
sovereign halo. Also in Union of India v. Sat Pal [AIR 1969 J&K 128],
Page 31 of 116
HC-NIC Page 31 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the plaintiff’s claim for Rs.500/­ being the penalty imposed by the Land
customs Authority was rejected on the authority of the Supreme Court
decisions as the levy of penalty was a power vested in the Land customs
officers under the Statute.
●     MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC PATH:
22 The State maintains public paths, for the welfare of the general
public and there is no commercial object in it. So, laying public path and
its maintenance are part of sovereign functions of the State. In Mclnerny
v. Secretary of State [(1911) 38 ILR Cal 797], the Calcutta High Court
held that, the Government was not carrying any commercial operations
in maintaining a public path and therefore was not liable for damages
for the injury sustained by the plaintiff through coming into contact with
a post set up by the Government on a public road.
●     MAINTENANCE OF MILITARY ROAD:
23 Maintenance of military road is one of the sovereign functions of
the   State.  It   is   carried   out   by   the   public   works  department   for   the
purposes of defense. In Secretary of State v. Cockraft [AIR 1965 Mad.
993] where the plaintiff was injured by the negligent act of the servant
who left a heap of gravel on a military road over which no one was
walking. A suit for damages against the Government, was held not to be
maintainable by the Madras High Court because the maintenance of
roads particularly of a military road was one of the Sovereign, and not
the private functions of the government.
●     COMMANDING GOODS DURING WAR
24 As stated above, commandeering goods during war is sovereign
functions of the State in Kessoram Poddar & Co. v. Secretary of State
Page 32 of 116
HC-NIC Page 32 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
[AIR 1928 Cal. 74] the plaintiff company sued the Secretary of State to
recover  damages  for  the  injury sustained  by  them  by  reason  of  the
defendant’s failure to take delivery and pay for certain goods bought by
the defendant from it by commandeering Orders. Rejecting the claim,
Chotznar J, held that the commandeering Order was one which no one
but  the  Government could  make   and  being  an  act  of   the  sovereign
power, the Secretary of State could not be sued in respect of it.
●     TRAINING FOR DEFENCE:
25 The training provided by the State for the purpose of defense is to
secure the general public and it is the sovereign function. In Secretary of
State v. Nagerao Limbaji [AIR 1943 Nag. 287] the plaintiff brought a
suit against the Secretary of State for damages for the loss of his finger
due to the explosion of an ignition sot lying near the area which was
used as a practice bombing ground by the military authorities. It was
held that the provision of facilities for bombing practice was a public
duty undertaken by the State in order to provide training for the army.
Such duties are not exercised by the State for its own benefit, but for the
protection of the entire population.
●     ARREST AND DETENTION
26 Maintenance of law and order includes arrest and detention; it is
the sovereign function of the State when it is done in good faith. In M.A.
Kador Zailany v. Secretary of State [AIR 1931 Rang. 294] where some
police officer wrongfully arrested and imprisoned the plaintiff, he filed a
suit for damages against the Secretary of State. It was held that, the
Government was not liable for the wrongs done by its officers unless the
wrongful act is done either by Order or on its behalf and subsequently
ratified  or  adopted  by  it.  Similarly,  In  Gurucharan Kaur  v.  Madras
Page 33 of 116
HC-NIC Page 33 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Province [AIR 1942 Mad. 539]  the D.S.P. instructed the police SubInspector
to go to the station and prevent certain Maharaja from leaving
that station. The fact however was that it was not the Maharaja but his
wife, the Maharani and his daughter alone were awaiting the arrival of
the train in her own car. On the arrival of the train, the Sub­Inspector
acting under a bonafide, though erroneous belief, that he was to detain
the Maharani, not only prevented the Maharani from boarding the train
but   also   got   the   gate   in   the   iron   fencing   closed   and   posted   two
constables near it. A suit was brought by the Maharani and her daughter
for wrongful confinement. It was held that the Government could not be
held liable for the acts of police done in discharge of their statutory duty
in   “good   faith”.   Thus,   if   the   wrongful   restraint   by   the   government
servant is made in “good faith,” the State is not liable.
●     PERFORMANCE OF MILITARY DUTY:
27 In Union of India v. Harbans Singh [AIR 1959 P&H 39] where as
a result of rash and negligent act of a driver of a truck of the Military
Department of the Union of India, who was engaged in Military duty, in
supplying meals to military personnel on duty the plaintiff s father was ‟
knocked down and run over. The State was held not liable as the act of
the driver was done whilst he was performing sovereign function.
In Thangarajan v. Union of India [AIR 1975 Mad. 32] a defense
lorry was carrying carbon dioxide gas from a factory to the ship I.N.S.
Jamuna. By the negligent act of driver it dashed a small boy. On a suit
against the State, the Court held that the lorry belonged to the defense
department.  Union   of   India   was  driven   in   the   exercise   of   sovereign
function. So, State is immune from liability.
Page 34 of 116
HC-NIC Page 34 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
State is not liable for the acts of its servant when such acts are
committed without the authority of law. In such cases, State cannot be
held liable because there is no act on the part of the State which holds
the State responsible. The officials of the State enjoy a vast discretionary
power which affects the individual rights. They should be held liable for
improper exercise or abuse of discretion. In this regard, the Indian Law
commission has recommended that the State should be liable if in the
discharge   of   statutory   duties   imposed   upon   it   or   its   employees,   the
employees act negligently or maliciously, whether or not discretion is
involved in the exercise of such duty.
●     MAINTENANCE OF NATIONAL HIGHWAYS
28 A welfare State has to maintain proper roads for the benefits of
the   general   public.   It   is   part   of   its   sovereign   function.   In  K.
Krishnamurthy v. State of A.P. [AIR 1956 SC 333] the driver of a motor
road roller negligently struck the plaintiff down and his right hand fell
under the front wheel. The driver did not stop the engine forthwith. The
plaintiff claimed damages from the State for the permanent loss of his
limb occasioned by the rash and negligent act of their  servant. The
Andhra Pradesh High Court, held that the making and maintenance of
National   Highways   is   the  exclusive   duty   of   the   State,   and   not   a
commercial function.
●     KEEPING STOLEN GOODS IN THE POLICE MALKHANA:
29 In Kasturi Lal v. State of U.P. [AIR 1965 SC 1039], the appellant
was arrested by three constables and his belongings like gold and silver
were seized on the suspicion that they were stolen properties. When he
was released on bail the silver was returned and the gold was kept at the
police malkhana in the custody of a head constable. But the constable in
Page 35 of 116
HC-NIC Page 35 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
charge of the malkhana misappropriated it and fled to Pakistan. The
trader therefore, filed a suit against the State of Uttar Pradesh claiming
the return of the gold or in the alternative, the full price of the gold. It
was proved that the authorities were negligent in keeping the gold in
safe   custody.   Gajendragadkar   C.J.,   observed:   If   a   tortious   act   is
committed by a public servant and it gives rise to a claim for damages,
the question to ask is: Was the tortious act committed by the public
servant in discharge of statutory functions which are referable to and
ultimately based on the delegation of the sovereign powers of the State
to such public servant. The act of negligence was committed by the
police officers while dealing with the property of Kasturi Lal, which they
had seized in exercise of their statutory powers. To arrest and detain a
suspicious person and to seize his suspicious possessions are delegated
sovereign powers of the Government officers under the Statute. Thus,
the State was held immune from liability.
This   position   was   also   followed   in  State of Uttar  Pradesh  v.
Chhotoy  Lal   [AIR  1967  All.   3247] where   the   police   on   suspicion,
arrested the plaintiff and seized 16 bags of Khandasari sugar of which
the   movement   was   banned   under   the   U.P.   Control   of   Supplies
(Temporary Power) Ordinance 11 of 1946. But the police could not
account for the bags of sugar which had disappeared while in their
custody. It was held that, the station officer who seized the plaintiff  –
respondent s goods acted in the discharge of statutory duties or to use ‟
the words of the Supreme Court “in the exercise of delegated Sovereign
power”. Therefore, the State is not vicariously liable for any loss to the
plaintiffs resulting from the station officer s misconduct or negligence or ‟
misconduct of any other State official or officials. In Oma Par shad v.
Secretary of State [AIR 1937 Lah. 572], the Secretary of State was held
not liable for any criminal act of his employee, e.g. where a party sued
Page 36 of 116
HC-NIC Page 36 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the Secretary of State for the recovery of stolen property, which during
the trial of the thieves were kept in the malkhana and were appropriated
by the government employee in charge of the malkhana.  Keeping the
stolen goods in the malkhana was a sovereign function and so there can
be no action in respect of them though a private employer will be liable
if his servant purloined the goods of “x  left in the possession of   ‟ his
employer. This was explained by the Chief Justice Gajendragadkhar, in
Kasturi Lal v. State of U.P. [AIR 1965 SC 1039].
It is submitted that the reason behind the decision in Kasturi Lal’s
case  is  totally illogical as it erroneously adopted the pre­constitutional
rule and identified  statutory power as sovereign power. An official s‟
immunity corresponding to the statutory power was available only to the
bonafide exercise of power, but not to the abuse or misuse of the same.
The  Kasturi  Lal’s  case  is widely  criticized  by  Jurists  as it  is  a  clear
example of an improper application of an inadmissible test.
●     MALICIOUS PROSECUTION:
30 Maharaja Bose v. Governor General in Council [AIR 1952 Cal.
242],  this   is   the   case   of   wrongful   arrest   and   malicious   prosecution
brought   against   the   Governor   General   in   Council   for   damages.   The
plaintiff   in   this   case   was  travelling   by  the  defendants  Railway   from
Howrah   to   Patna.   On   February   3,   1944,   he   boarded   an   interclass
compartment in the 5 up Punjab mail at Howrah. On 4th at about 1 A.M.
When the said train stopped at Asansol Railway station, 3 Indian soldiers
forcibly occupied the plaintiff s seat. The plaintiff protested against this ‟
and he informed it to two employees of the Railways. But they did not
take any steps in this matter. When the train started moving, the soldiers
threatened the plaintiff with violence. Out of fear for his personal safety,
Page 37 of 116
HC-NIC Page 37 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
he pulled the emergency chain and caused the train to stop. Defendant’s
servants to whom the plaintiff had earlier complained reached and made
certain   enquiries   and   asked   the   soldiers   to   vacate   it.   When   such
conversation was going on the Assistant Station master on duty rushed
to the compartment and accused the plaintiff for pulling the chain and
abused   him   by   using   filthy   languages   and   severely   assaulted   him.
Without hearing any more explanation, the plaintiff was dragged out of
the compartment, and was given into the custody of a railway police on
false charges and detained there. It was stated that the plaintiff was a
notable dancer and was on the way to take part in a dance programme
at Patna in aid of Red Cross. But the plaintiff failed to disclose his name
and identity so the railway servant arrested him. The plaintiff was tried
by the Magistrate and ultimately acquitted on July 24, 1944 and was
released on a personal bond. The plaintiff claimed compensation on the
ground of vicarious liability. It was argued on behalf of the defendant
that in as much as the railway servant is concerned, he had acted in the
“bona­fide  exercise of powers un ‟ der the Railways Act. Hence, no suit
lay against the State. In this case, the issues were that whether the suit is
maintainable?   Was   the   plaintiff   prosecuted   maliciously   and   without
reasonable and probable cause? Was he wrongfully arrested? And what
damages, if any, did the plaintiff suffer for which the defendant was
answerable.
The Court held that the plaintiff had no sufficient cause for pulling
the  communication   chain.   The   defendant’s   servant   was   justified   in
handling the plaintiff over to the police for non disclosure of his name
and address. The Court also held that the defendant’s servants honestly
and reasonably believed the guilt  of the plaintiff and this negated the
malice. The suit was dismissed and the State was not held liable for the
act of the employee.
Page 38 of 116
HC-NIC Page 38 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
The above decision protects the State’s servant on the ground of
statutory  immunity.   It   is   evident   that   the   employee   of   the   railway
department committed wrong. The theory of benefit applied in this case,
showed that the judiciary was also very lenient to the State and the
affected ordinary individual was left out without remedy. In  State of
M.P. v. Dattamal [AIR 1967 MP 246] one Ramachandra was killed by
police firing, while controlling a riot on 21st, July 1954. On the date of
occurrence there was a student s agitation at the main road at Indore. ‟
The District Magistrate  ordered firing. At that time, Ramachandra and
his grandson were nearing their house by car after closing their shop.
One   of   the   bullets   pierced   the   car   and   entered   in   to   the   body   of
Ramachandra, and as a result he died. The legal heirs claimed damages
for   the   illegal   shooting.   The   trial   Court   ordered   damages   for   the
negligent act of the police.
This   Order   was   challenged   by   the   State.   The   appellate   Court
reversed the Order of the trial Court and held that maintaining of law
and order by way of police firing to control riot amounts to sovereign
functions of the State. So, liability would not arise. Thus there is no
remedy in Indian law since there is no codified law to deal vicarious
liability of State like Federal Claims Act and Crown Proceedings Act.
It is unjustifiable that an innocent businessman was shot dead
which  threatened the right to life guaranteed by the Constitution. The
Court also did not see  the  loss due  to the  negligence  of  the  police
official. Rejection of damages resulted with the economic stress on the
innocent family.
●     MAINTENANCE OF LAW AND ORDER:
Page 39 of 116
HC-NIC Page 39 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
31 In State of Orissa v. Padmalochan [AIR 1975 Ori. 41], the Orissa
Military Police made a lathi charge on a mob assembled in front of the
District Court to press their demands.  It was stated that without any
Order   from   the   Magistrate   or   other   police   authorities   the  police
personnel   assaulted   members   of   the   mob,   as   a   result   of   which   the
plaintiff received injuries. He filed a suit for damages against the State
for injuries caused to him. The lower Court decided in favour of the
claimant but on appeal, the High Court pointed out that, the police
personnel   committed   excess   in   discharge   of   their   functions   without
authority and that would not take away the illegal act from the purview
of delegated sovereign function and held that the injuries caused to the
plaintiff   by   the   police   while   dispersing   the   unlawful   mob   were   in
exercise of the sovereign function of the State.
Similarly in State of M.P. v. Chironji Lal [AIR 1981 MP 65], the
police, while regulating the procession, made a lathi­charge and caused
damage to the property of the respondent, the State Government will
not be liable for the damage. The functions of the State of regulating
processions is delegated to the police by section 30 of the Police Act,
1861  and   the   function   of   maintaining   law   and  order,  including   the
quelling of riots, is delegated to the authorities specified by section 14 of
the   Code   of   Criminal   Procedure,   1973.   Those   functions   cannot   be
performed by private individuals. They are powers  exercisable by the
State or its delegates as “Sovereign Functions” of the State.
●     COLLECTION OF REVENUE:
32 The State is not liable for any wrong done by a public official in
the purported exercise of his statutory duties in the area of sovereign
activities of the State like collection of revenue etc.
Page 40 of 116
HC-NIC Page 40 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
In Kuppanna Chetty & Co. v. Collector of Anantapur [AIR 1965
AP 457] the Tahsildar wrongfully attached the movable goods under the
Madras Revenue Recovery Act and thereby caused considerable damage
to the plaintiffs. The Court held that since the collection of revenue was
a sovereign or purely State activity, the State was not liable for any tort
committed by a Government employee in the course of such activity in
breach  of  his   statutory   duties.   This   was upheld  in  State of Andhra
Pradesh  v.  Ankanna  [AIR  1967  AP  41] the   revenue   officers   acted
illegally   and   maliciously   detained   a   bullock­cart   belonging   to   the
plaintiff for realizing the land revenue under the Revenue Recovery Act.
The Court held that the collection of land revenue is a sovereign function
and the State is not liable for the malicious act of its servants, when such
act is made under a Statute.
In   the   Pre­constitutional   period,   the   act   of   the   authorities   in
refusing license to the plaintiff relating to the imposition and collection
of excise duties [Nobin Chunder Day vs. Secretary of State (1876) ILR
1   Cal.   12]  were   held   as   sovereign   functions.   The   State   was   also
exempted from liability for a wrongful act of the collector of Chittagong
who paid the surplus sale proceeds of a Taluk not to the real owner but
to another person  [Secretary of State vs. Ramnath Bhatta, AIR 1934
Cal. 128].
33 The Andhra Pradesh High Court also held in another decision
[Venkataramadas   v.   Latchanna,   AIR   1966   AP   277]  that   the
Government is not liable for the illegal seizure of the property (later, the
property was sold at an auction  by the Government.) for arrears of
revenue due of respondent by a public officer (a head village Munsiff).
Page 41 of 116
HC-NIC Page 41 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
●     ACTS OF COURTS OF WARDS:
34 Generally acts of Courts of Wards are considered as sovereign
function of the State. So the State is immune from liability when there is
any fault of Court of wards. In  Secretary of State v. Srigobinda [AIR
1932 Cal. 834] the plaintiff s State was released from  ‟ the management
of the Court of Wards complaining that the manager appointed by the
Courts of Wards has not done his duty by realizing all money with
diligence. He has also not accounted to the Courts of Wards for certain
money which he  collected. It is not a case in which the plaintiff can
make the Secretary of State or the revenue of India liable.
●     ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE:
35 One of the functions of the State, in exercise of sovereign power,
is to take cognizance of offences coming to its knowledge and to order
the   trial   of   such   persons   in   accordance   with   law.   If   the   persons,
discharging administration of the justice, were found to be guilty, the
system of judicial functions cannot be carried out properly. So, statutory
protection   is   afforded   to   them,   by   the   Judicial   Officers Protection
Act,1960. This is available to the person whose acts can be deemed to
have been in his judicial capacity as a Judicial Officer.
A   government   servant   is   vested   with   both   „Judicial   and ‟
„executive   powers.   ‟ He   is   exempted   from  liability   only   if   he   is
discharging “Judicial acts” in the Courts of administration of justice. But
if   he   committed   the   tort   of   false   imprisonment   while   acting   in   his
executive capacity, he cannot claim sovereign immunity.36
In Mata Prasad v. Secretary of State [[AIR 1931 Oudh. 29], the
plaintiff   was   convicted   and  imprisoned   for   four   and   half   years   for
dacoity. He has also to pay a fine of Rs.500/­. But for his good conduct
Page 42 of 116
HC-NIC Page 42 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
he was released after 2 ½ years. The plaintiff claimed damages against
the Secretary of State for wrongful conviction of his officials. The Court
held that a person who has been charged by a competent Court and
punished for that offence is not, therefore, entitled to sue the Secretary
of State for India in council for damages in respect of the act of the State
in exercise of its sovereign powers. Similarly, in  Secretary of State v.
Sukhdeo [(1899) 21 All. 341]  the Magistrate in his official capacity,
ordered to seize certain property belonging to the plaintiff in satisfaction
of fine imposed on his son. On the suit brought by the plaintiff for
recovery of property, the Court held that the secretary of State was not
liable for the seizure of property by the Court.
In Maha Nirbani v. Secretary of State [AIR 1922 All. 2705], the
presiding officer of the criminal Court directed, some ornaments which
was delivered by the plaintiff to a police officer, to be returned to the
original owner and not to the plaintiff. In the suit by the plaintiff, the
Court  expressed  the  view  that   the  State  was  not liable  for   the  loss
resulting from a wrong Order of the Court.
Non­liability of the State can be imposed only if any loss is caused
to any person by any officer when he is acting under judicial capacity.
On this basis the State was held not liable for wrong warrants issued by
the judicial officer, as judicial act belongs to the category of sovereign
powers.
●     NON­LIABILITY   OF   THE   STATE   UNDER   LEGISLATIVE
PROTECTION:
36 Now   the   extent   of   liability   and   immunity   of   State   under   tort
depends on the nature of the power and manner of its exercise. The
Page 43 of 116
HC-NIC Page 43 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Constitution of India, provides legislative supremacy subject to Judicial
review. The Parliament is free to enact any legislation on any topics and
any   subjects   authorized   by   the   Constitutional   provisions   without
violating basic structure of the Constitution. Likewise, the executive is
also free to execute the actions through law. Thus the legislature may
enact bad law due to its negligence or the law may be affected due to
failure of compliance of fundamental rights or public policy. In such
circumstances, the affected person cannot approach a Court of law for
negligence in making law. The legislature may justify it on the ground of
public interest and the executive may also justify it on the same ground.
Thus the statutory provisions protect the acts of State for its smooth
functioning. Even though it is conflicting with the modern concept of
sovereignty, the State should not be answerable in torts. But it is not
acceptable that the affected common man is left out without remedy. It
is left to the judiciary to render social justice in case when injustice is
done due to the legislative or executive action. In such cases, the officers
are made personally liable for torts. In such situation the question is why
the State is exempted from liability when the officers who are linked
with the State are made liable? For better understanding of this chapter,
the following are some of the statutory provisions which protect the
State from suits. These provisions protect the State for action taken in
good faith.  The following are protection  clauses provided in various
legislations exempt the State from liability.
1. THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACT, 2000
Section 34 of The Information Technology Act, 200040reads: No
suit   prosecution   or   legal   proceeding   shall   lie   against   the   Central
Government, the Controller or any person acting on behalf of him, the
presiding officer, adjudicating officers and staff of the Cyber Appellate
Page 44 of 116
HC-NIC Page 44 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Tribunal, for anything which is in good faith done or intended to be
done in pursuance of this Act or any rule or regulation or order made
there under.
2. DRUGS AND COSMETICS ACT, 1940:
Section 37 of Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940,41 reads as “No suit,
prosecution or other legal proceedings shall lie against any person for
anything which is in good faith done or intended to be done under this
Act”.
3. CHIT FUNDS ACT, 1982
Section 88 of Chit Funds Act, 1982 (Act 23 of 1940) reads as “No
suit, prosecution or  other legal proceeding shall lie against the State
Government, the Registrar or other officers of the State Government, of
the   Reserve   Bank   or   any   of   its   officers   exercising   any   powers   or
discharging any functions under this Act in respect of anything which is
in good faith done or intended to be done in pursuance of this Act or the
rules made there under”.
4. CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT, 1986
Section 28 of Consumer Protection Act, 1986 (Act 68 of 1986)
provides: No suit, prosecution or other legal proceeding shall lie against
the members of the District Forum, or the State  Commission or the
National Commission or any officer or person acting under the direction
of the District Forum, the State Commission or the National Commission
or executing any order made by it or in respect of anything which is in
good faith done or intended to be done by such member, officer or
person under this Act or under any rule or order made there under.
Page 45 of 116
HC-NIC Page 45 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
5. INSURANCE   (REGULATORY   AND   DEVELOPMENT   AUTHORITY)
ACT, 1999
Section 22, of Insurance (Regulation and Development) Act, 1999
(Act   41   of   1991)   reads  as   “No   suit,   prosecution   or   other   legal
proceedings shall lie against the Central  Government or any officer of
the Central Government or any member, officer or other employee of the
authority for any act which is in good faith done or intended to be done
under this Act or rules or regulations made there under”.
6. NARCOTIC DRUGS AND PSYCHOTROPIC SUBSTANCES ACT, 1985
Section 69 of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Act,
1985 (Act 61 of 1985) provides as “No suit, prosecution or other legal
proceeding   shall   lie   against   the   Central  Government   or   the   State
Government or any officer of the Central Government or of the State
Government   any   person   exercising   any   powers   or   discharging   any
functions or performing any duties under this Act, for anything in good
faith done or intended to be done under this Act or any rule or order
made there under.”
7. PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS ACT, 1993
Section 38 of Protection of Human Rights Act, 199346 provides
that  “No  suit or other legal proceedings shall lie against the Central
Government,   the   State   Government   or   any   member   thereof   or   any
person acting under the direction either of the Central Government, the
State Government, the commission or the State Commission, in respect
of anything  which is in good faith  done or intended to be done in
pursuance of this Act or of any rules or any order made there under or in
respect of the  publication,  by or under the  authority  of  the  Central
Page 46 of 116
HC-NIC Page 46 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Government,   the   State   Government,   the   Commission   or   the   State
Commission, of any report, paper or proceedings”.
8. CIVIL PROCEDURE CODE, 1908
Section 80 of Civil Procedure Code, 1908 (Act 5 of 1908) provides
that no suit can be instituted against the government until the expiration
of two months after a notice in writing has been given.
Section 82 of the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908, when a decree is
passed  against the Union of India or a State, it shall not be executed
unless it remains unsatisfied for a period of three months from the date
of such decree.
Article 112 of the Limitation Act, 1963, any suit by or on behalf of
the  Central   Government   or   any   State   Government   can   be   instituted
within the period of 30 years.
9. MONOPOLIES AND RESTRICTIVE TRADE PRACTICES ACT 1969
Section   3   of   Monopolies   and   Restrictive   Trade   Practices   Act
196948 says that the Act shall not apply in certain cases unless the
Central Government [by notification], otherwise directs, this Act shall
not apply to.
(a)   Any   undertaking   owned   or   controlled   by   a   Government
company,
(b) Any undertaking owned or controlled by the Government,
(c) Any undertaking owned or controlled by a corporation (not
being a company) established by or under any Central Provincial
or State Act,
(d) Any trade union or other association of workmen or employees
Page 47 of 116
HC-NIC Page 47 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
formed for  their own reasonable protection as such workmen or
employees,
(e) Any undertaking engaged in an industry , the management of
which has been taken over by any person or body of persons in
pursuance of any authorization made by the Central Government
under any law for the time being in force,
(f) Any undertaking owned by a co­operative society formed and
registered under any Central, Provincial or State Act relating to cooperative
societies,
(g) Any financial institution.
a) The Act is not applicable in the following situations:­
The   undertaking   owned   or   controlled   by   the   Government   or
Government companies, as the case may be and which are engaged in
the production of arms and ammunition and allied items of defense
equipment,   defense   aircraft   and   warships,   atomic   energy,   minerals
specified in the Schedule to the Atomic Energy (Control of Production
and   Use)   Order,   1953   and   industrial   units   under   the   Currency   and
Coinage Division, Ministry of Finance, Government of India.
b) Any restrictive or unfair trade practice expressly authorized by any
law for the time being in force.
c) A restrictive trade practice flowing from an agreement which has the
approval  of the central government or if central government is a
party to such agreement.
In addition to the above, any monopolistic trade practice which
Page 48 of 116
HC-NIC Page 48 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
was expressly authorized by any enactment for the time being in force or
when it is necessary to
1. Meet the defense requirement of the country,
2. ensure maintenance of supply of essential goods and services, or
3. Give effect to any agreement to which Central Government is a
party was also exempted from the purview of the Act.
10. THE COMPETITION ACT 2002
Section   2(h)   of   The   Competition   Act   2002   (Act   12   of   2003)
provides an exemption for activities of the government relatable to the
sovereign functions of the State.  Section 54 of the Act, empowers the
Central Government to exempt the  application of any provision of the
Act to an enterprise performing a sovereign function on behalf of the
Central or State Government, through a notification. Thus, one problem
with the wordings of these two sections taken together is the confusion
as   to   whether   an   enterprise   carrying   out   an   activity   relatable   to
sovereign   functions   requires   an   express   notification   by   the   Central
Government by virtue of Section 54 for exemption; or would anyway be
excluded from the scope of an „enterprise  under section 2(h). ‟
Although   what   a   “Sovereign   function   is   has   never   been ‟
elucidated by the  Commission or Courts in the context of competition
law,   interpretation   of   the   term   has   been   carried   out   for   other
legislations.   It   has   been   extensively   discussed   in   the  context   of
understanding,   the   scope   of   the   term   other   authorities’   under   the
definition of State  under Article 12 of the Constitution, which include ‟
bodies that are agencies and instrumentalities of the State.
11. NATIONAL SECURITY ACT 1980
Page 49 of 116
HC-NIC Page 49 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Section   16   of   National   Security   Act   1980   (Act   65   of   1980)
provides protection of action taken in good faith. No suit or other legal
proceeding shall lie against Central Government, or a State Government,
and no suit, prosecution or other legal proceeding shall be against any
person,   for  anything   in   good   faith   done   or   intended  to   be   done  in
pursuance of this Act
It   is   evident   that   the   immunity   of   the   Crown   in   the   United
Kingdom was based on the feudalistic notions of justice, namely the King
can do no wrong. One should understand the position of the king as an
administrator   and   what   are   the   powers   which   are   considered   as
sovereign powers? India as a welfare country, having its constitutional
law approves immunity to the government unlike various legislations.
However the Indian Governmental functions carried out by its servants
cannot   be   left   free   for   their   wrong   doings.   To   bring   a   balance   in
administration and to achieve the goals of the Indian Constitution, the
State   is   protected   from   liability   for   its   sovereign   activities.   The
Competition   Act   2002,   also   brings   a   distinction   of   governmental
functions   into   sovereign   functions   and   non   sovereign   functions.   The
sovereign functions as specified in this Act are functions carried out by
the departments of Central Government dealing with atomic energy,
space, defense and currency which are excluded from the purview of this
Act. On the question of „what is sovereign function , different opinions ‟
have been given time to time and again and attempts have been made to
explain it in different ways:
●     VARIOUS TESTS TO IDENTIFY THE NATURE OF FUNCTIONS OF
THE STATE:
37 (1) Primary and Inalienable Functions:
Page 50 of 116
HC-NIC Page 50 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Krishna Iyer J, in Bangalore Water Supply and Seweragre board
v.  A.   Rajappa    [AIR  (1978)  SCC  548]  said   that   the   definition   of
“industry  although of wide amplitude can  ‟ be restricted to take out of its
purview   certain   sovereign   functions   of   the   State,  limited   to   its
“inalienable functions . ‟
As to what are inalienable functions ,  ‟ Lord Watson, in Coomber
v.  Justices of Berks [(1883­84) 9 App. Cas. 61, 74]  describes   the
functions such as administration of justice, maintenance of order and
repression of crime, as among the primary and inalienable functions of a
constitutional Government.
However, the Supreme Court has also held that the definition can
include the regal primary and inalienable functions of the State, though
the statutory delegated functions to a Corporation and the ambit of such
functions cannot be extended so as to include the activities of a modern
State and must be confined to legislative power, administration of law
and judicial powers.53
37 (2) Regal & Non­Regal Functions
Isaacs,   J.   in   his   dissenting   judgment   in  The  Federated  State
School  Teachers  Association  of  Australia  v.  The  State  of  Victoria
[(1929) 41 CLR 569] concisely States “Regal functions are inescapable
and inalienable. Such are the legislative power, the administration of
laws, the exercise of the judicial power. Non­regal functions may be
assumed by means of the legislative power. But when they are assumed
the State acts simply as a huge corporation, with its legislation as the
charter. Its action under the legislation, so far as it is not regal execution
of the law is merely analogous to what a private company is similarly
Page 51 of 116
HC-NIC Page 51 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
authorized.55   These   words   clearly   mark   out   the   ambit   of   the   regal
functions which are distinguished from the other powers of a State.
37 (3) Governmental Functions
What is meant by the use of the term “sovereign”, in relation to
the  activities of the State, is more accurately brought out by using the
term “Governmental” functions although there are difficulties here also
in as much as the Government has entered largely new fields of industry.
Therefore, only those services which are governed by separate rules and
constitutional provisions, such as Articles 310 and 311 should, strictly
speaking   be   excluded   from   the   sphere   of   industry   by   necessary
implication.56
37 (4) Constitutional Functions:
The learned judges in  the Bangalore Water Supply & Severage
Board v. A. Rajappa [AIR 1978 SC 48] a Sewerage Board case seem to
have   confined   only   such   sovereign  function   outside   the   purview   of
„industry  which can be termed strictly as  ‟ constitutional functions of the
three   wings   of   the   State   I.e.   executive,   legislature   and   judiciary.
However, the concept is still the same with insubstantial differences
between the terms. This can be noticed by the following observation by
the Court in  Nagendra Rao and Co. v. The State of Andhra Pradesh
[AIR 1994 SC 2663] as to which function could be, and should be, taken
as regal or sovereign function. It has been recently examined by the
Bench of the Court, where in the words of Hansaria. J, the old and
archaic concept of sovereignty does not survive as sovereignty now vests
in   the   people.   It   is   because   of   this,   that   in   an   Australian   case,  the
distinction   between   sovereign   and   non­sovereign   functions   was
Page 52 of 116
HC-NIC Page 52 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
categorized as regal and non­regal. In some cases, the expression used is
State function, whereas in some Governmental functions.
37  (5) Nature and form of activity
“It is now increasingly necessary to abandon the lingering fiction
of a legally indivisible State and of a feudal conception of the crown, and
to substitute for it the principle of legal liability where the State either
directly or through incorporated public authorities, engages in activities
of a commercial, industrial or managerial character. The proper test is
not   an   impracticable   distinction   between   governmental   and   nongovernmental
function,   but   the   nature   and   form   of   the   activity   in
question”. [Ghaziabad Development Authority vs. Balbir Singh, AIR
2005 SC 1206].
37 (6) The dominant nature test
(a)   Where   a   complex   of   activities,   some   of   which   qualify   for
exemption,   others  not,   involves   employees   on   the   total
undertaking, or some departments are not productive of goods
and services if isolated, even then, the predominant nature of the
services and the integrated nature of the departments as explained
in the  Corporation of Nagpur v. Its Employees [AIR 1960 SC
675]  will   be   the   true   test.   The   whole  undertaking   will   be
“industry  although those who are not “workmen  by   ‟ ‟ definition
may not be benefited by the statutes.
(b) Sovereign functions, strictly understood, (alone) qualify for
exemption,   not   the  welfare   activities   or   economic   adventures
undertaken by government or statutory bodies.
(c) Even in departments discharging sovereign functions, if their
Page 53 of 116
HC-NIC Page 53 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
core   units   which  are   industries   and   they   are   substantially
severable, then they can be considered to come within section 2(j)
the definition of “industry .  ‟
(d) Constitutional and competently enacted legislative provisions
may   well   remove  from   the   scope   of   the   Act   categories   which
otherwise may be covered thereby.
As   per   the  Bangalore   Water­Supply   case,   sovereign   functions
“strictly understood” alone qualify for exemption; and not the welfare
activities   or  economic  adventures  undertaken   by  the   Government.   A
rider has been added that even in the department discharging sovereign
functions,   if   there   are   units   which   are   industries   and   they   are
substantially severable, then they can be considered to be an industry. As
to   which   activities   of   the   Government   could   be   called   sovereign
functions strictly understood, had not been spelt out in the aforesaid
case.
In relation to what are “sovereign” and what are “non­sovereign”
functions,  this Court in the Chief Conservator of Forests and Anr. v.
Jagannath Maruti Kandhare and Ors. [(1996) 1 LLJ 1223 (SC)] holds;
“We may not go by the labels, Let us reach the hub. And the same is that
the dichotomy of sovereign and non­sovereign functions does not really
exist­ it would all depend on the nature of the power and manner of its
exercise.”
As per the decision in this case, one of the tests to determine
whether  the  executive  function is sovereign in nature is to find out
whether the State is answerable for such action in Courts of law. It was
stated by Sahai, J. that acts like defense of the country, raising armed
Page 54 of 116
HC-NIC Page 54 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
forces and maintaining it, making peace of war, foreign affairs, power to
acquire and retain territory are functions which are indicative of external
sovereignty   and   are   political   in   nature.   They   are,   therefore,   not
amenable to the jurisdiction of ordinary civil Court in as much as the
State is immune from being sued in such matters. But then according to
this decision the immunity ends there. It was then observed that in a
welfare State, functions of the State are not only the defense of the
country or administration of justice or maintaining law and order but
extends to regulating and controlling the activities of people in almost
every sphere, educational, commercial, social, economic, political and
even martial. Because of this the demarcating line between sovereign
and   non­sovereign   powers   has   largely   disappeared.  The   aforesaid
observation shows that, if we were to extent the concept of  sovereign
function to include all welfare activities the ratio in  Bangalore Water
Supply case would get eroded, and substantially we would demur to do
so on the face of what was Stated in the aforesaid case according to
which   except   the   strictly   understood   sovereign   functions,   welfare
activities of the State would come within the purview of the definition of
industry; and not only this, even within the wider circle of sovereign
function, there may be an inner circle encompassing some units which
could be considered as industry if substantially severable.
37 (7) Predominant Nature of the Activity
As referred in part (a) of the Dominant Nature Test, the Court in
the Corporation of Nagpur case,63 evolved another test when there may
be cases where the said departments may not be in charge of a particular
activity or service covered by the definition of sovereign function but
also in charge of other activity or activities falling outside the definition.
In such cases, a working rule may be evolved to advance social justice
Page 55 of 116
HC-NIC Page 55 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
consistent with the principles of equity. In such cases, the solution to the
problem   depends   upon   the   answer   to   the   question   whether   such   a
department   is   primarily   and   predominantly   concerned   with   activity
relatable to the sovereign function or incidentally connected therewith.
It was also held in the same case that in a modern State the
sovereign power extends to all the statutory functions of the State except
to the business of trading the industrial transactions undertaken by its
quasi­private personality.
Also,  the  regal   functions  described  as  primary  and  inalienable
functions of the State though statutorily delegated to a corporation are
necessarily   excluded   from   the   purview   of   the   definition.   Such   regal
functions shall be confined to legislative power, administration of law
and judicial power.
In N. Nagendra Rao & Co. v. State of A.P. [AIR 1994 SC 2663]
defines non­sovereign  functions as “discharge of public duties under a
Statute, which are incidental or ancillary and not primary or inalienable
function of the State”. This decision holds that the State is immune only
in cases where its officers perform primary or inalienable functions such
as defense of the country administration of justice, maintenance of law
and order.
The Court gave an example where a search or seizure affected
under such law could be taken to be an exercise of power which may be
in domain of inalienable function. Whether the authority to which this
power is delegated is liable for negligence in discharge of duties while
performing such functions is a different matter. But when similar powers
are conferred under other Statute as incidental or ancillary power to
carry out the purpose and objective of the Act, then it being an exercise
of such State function which is not primary or inalienable, an officer
acting   negligently   is   liable   personally   and   the   State   vicariously.
Page 56 of 116
HC-NIC Page 56 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
[Agricultural Produce Market Committee vs. Shri Ashok Harikuni &
Another, etc., AIR 2000 SC 3116].
In fact, all governmental function cannot be construed as either
primary or  inalienable sovereign function. Hence even if some of the
functionaries under the Act could be said to be performing sovereign
functions of the Government that by itself would not make the dominant
object of the Act to be sovereign in nature. Various decisions rendered by
the Supreme Court prior to and after the decision in Bangalore Water
Supply v. A. Rajappa [(1978) 2 SCC 213], had been discussed by the
Supreme Court in the case of State of U.P. v. Jai Bir Singh [(2005) 5
SCC 1] where the Court inter alia wished to enter a caveat on confining
sovereign functions to the traditional functions, described as “inalienable
functions” comparable to those performed by a monarch, a ruler of a
non­democratic government. The concept of sovereignty is confined to
“law and order”, “defense”, “law making  and “justice dispensation”. In ‟
a democracy governed by the Constitution the  sovereignty vests in the
people and the State is obliged to discharge its constitutional obligations
contained in the Directive Principles of the State Policy in Part­IV of the
Constitution of India. From that point of view, wherever the government
undertakes the public welfare activities in discharge of its Constitutional
obligations, as provided in Part­IV of the Constitution, such activities
should   be   treated   as   activities   in   discharge   of   sovereign   functions.
Therefore,   such   welfare   governmental   activities   cannot   be   brought
within the fold of industrial law by giving an undue expansive and wide
meaning   to   the   words   used   in   the   definition   of   industry   regarding
immunity to sovereign powers.
●     IMMUNITY  OF  STATE  UNDER  THE  DOCTRINE  OF  “ACT  OF
STATE”:
Page 57 of 116
HC-NIC Page 57 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
38 There is no doubt that no action may be brought either against the
crown or  any one else in respect of an act of State  [W.V.H. Rogers,
Winfield and Jolowicz on Tort, 702 (14 Edn Sweet & Maxwell, 1994].
An act of State, under the English law is an act of the executive as a
matter of policy performed in the course of its relations with another
State or during its relations with the subjects of that State, unless they
are temporarily within the allegiance of the Crown [Wade and Bradlye,
Constitutional Law, 265 (Edn., 1971]. In the words of Hartley and
Griffith [Hartley and Griffith, Government and Law 287 (1976)], the
term means an act of such character that the Courts have no jurisdiction
to determine its lawfulness. Thus it is an act of a sovereign against
another sovereign or an alien outside its territory. An act of State derives
its authority not from municipal law but from ultra­legal or supra­legal
means [M.P. Jain and S.N. Jain, Principles of Administrative Law, 816
(Edn.,   2007)].  Municipal   Courts   have   no   power   to   examine   the
propriety or legality of an act of State. The term is defined by various
writers, [A History of the Criminal Law of England (1883) Edn.) Vol. 2
p.p. 61­62],  Lord Atkin in  Eshughay  v.   The Government of Nigeria
defined the term as:
“An act of the sovereign power directed against another sovereign
power  not   owing   temporary   allegiance   in   pursuance   of   sovereign
rights of waging war or maintaining peace on the high seas or abroad,
may   give  rise  to  no  legal   remedy.  But  as  applied   to  acts   of   the
executive directed to subjects within those territorial  jurisdictions it
has   no   special   meaning,   and   can   give   no   immunity   from   the
jurisdiction of the Court to inquire the legality of the act”.
A nation is sovereign within its own borders, and its domestic
actions may  not be questioned in the Courts of another nation. The
Page 58 of 116
HC-NIC Page 58 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
object   of   the   act   of   State  doctrine   is   to   protect   the   Executive s‟
prerogatives in foreign affairs. The act of State doctrine is applied for the
act of a governmental body or of a body having governmental powers
and   must   be   carried   out   in   the   exercise   of   such   governmental   or
sovereign   powers   and   the   act   in   question   must   be   a   formal   act   or
evidenced by formal action such as legislation or an executive order.
a) Act of State and Sovereign Immunity
The   Act   of   State   doctrine   differs   from   sovereign   immunity
doctrine. The Act of  State  doctrine provides sovereign States with a
substantive defense on the merits. But a claim of sovereign immunity,
which merely raises a jurisdictional defense. The Courts of one State will
not question the validity of public acts performed by other sovereigns
within their own borders, even when such Courts have jurisdiction over
a controversy of in which one of the litigants had stood to challenge
those acts. But this is not so in sovereign immunity. Act of State does not
deal with the subjects of the State but deals with foreigners who cannot
seek the protection of the municipal law. It is a sovereign act of the
government performed in exercise of its executive prerogative sanction
for which is derived from sovereignty of the State [Union of India vs.
Ram Kamal, AIR 1953 Assam 116].  Thus the act of State doctrine
operates extra territorially and it is difficult to conserve of an act of State
as   between   a   sovereign   and   his   subjects  [P.V.   Rao   vs.   Kushaldas
Adwani, AIR 1949 Bom. 277 at 279].
b) History and Development
The Act of State doctrine was initially developed in US in cases
against  officials   or   agents   of   foreign   government   and   applied   as   a
corollary to the personal immunity of foreign sovereigns. In Underhill v.
Page 59 of 116
HC-NIC Page 59 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Hernandez [168 US 250 (1897)], the Supreme Court of United State of
America held that a citizen of the United States was not entitled to
recover damages in a United States Court from a Venezuelan military
General who refused to issue a passport to him because the acts of
General were held to be acts of the Venezuelan government.
In France and in some continental countries under “Act of State”
doctrine,  officers acting in their official capacity are not cognizable by
the ordinary Courts, nor are they subject to the ordinary laws of the
land.
c) Essentials of “Act of State”
The essence of an “Act of State  in the exercise of sovereign power ‟
exercised arbitrarily on principles either outside or paramount to the
municipal law [Saurashtra v. Menon Haji Ismail, AIR 1959 SC 1383].
If   a   transaction   takes  place   in   one   jurisdiction   and   the   forum   is   in
another, the Court merely declines to adjudicate or makes applicable its
own law to parties or property before it. The refusal of one country to
enforce the penal laws of another is a typical example of an instance
when the Court will not entertain a cause of action arising in another
jurisdiction. The United States Supreme Court in  Banco Nacional De
Cuba  v.  Sebbatino  [398  U.S.  (1964)],  Cuba   nationalized   its   sugar
industry, taking control of sugar refineries and other companies in the
wake of the Cuban revolution. The case involved a claim by Cuba for the
price of a cargo of sugar which had been expropriated by the Cuban
government, and then sold to a U.S. commodity broker (Farr, whitlock
&Co.). In addition to the Cuban claim, Farr was faced with a claim from
the receivers of original owner (Sebbatino) who argued that the Cuban
expropriation was contrary to international law. Both the District Court
and the Court of Appeals, found in favour Sebbatino, holding that the
Page 60 of 116
HC-NIC Page 60 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Act of State doctrine was in applicable where the relevant foreign act
was   in   violation   of   international   law.   However,   the   Supreme   Court
reversed this decision.  Justice Harlan applied the Act of State doctrine
and held that US Courts could not  question the validity of the Cuban
expropriations even if the plaintiff alleged a violation of international
law.
The Supreme Court of United States [W.S. Kirk Patrick & Co. v.
Environmental Tectonics Crop. Int’l, 493 (U.S. 1990)] held that the Act
of State doctrine applies only when a US Court must declare such official
act “invalid, and thus ineffective as a rule of decision for the Courts of
this country”.
In  Secretary of State v. Hari Bhanji [(1882) ILR 5 mad. 273],
the plaintiff had sued for the return of a certain sum of money alleged to
have been illegally seized from him as import duty on salt. The Madras
High Court did not follow  Nobin Chunder Dey  v.  Secretary of State
[(1876) ILR 1 Cal. 12] and held that the act of State of which the
municipal Courts in British India were debarred from taking cognizance
were acts done in the exercise of sovereign powers which were not
justified by municipal law. In India, actions which are purportedly taken
under municipal law are denied the status of act of State if the private
party only seeks to set aside the action [Bombay v. Khushaldes, Adveni,
AIR (1950) SC 222 at 249]. But if he claims damages in tort the Courts
generally examine whether the power exercised was sovereign in nature,
and denies relief if it is found in the affirmative  [Kasturilal vs. Uttar
Pradesh, AIR (1965) SC 1039; Thangarajan v. Union of India, AIR
(1975) Mad 32].  Even though the distinction between sovereign and
non   sovereign   functions   was   doubted83,   the   view   has   never   been
overruled. The present tendency is to minimize the use of the distinction
and to award damages.
Page 61 of 116
HC-NIC Page 61 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
It follows that to raise a defense of „act of State  three conditions ‟
must   be  fulfilled.   The   first   is   that   the   act   must   be   authorized   or
subsequently ratified by the government. The second is that act must be
committed   outside   the   territory   of   India,   and   the   third   is   that   the
plaintiff must be an alien. Another important thing to remember is, in
speaking of the exercise of sovereign power a clear distinction must be
made   between  exercise   of   power   in   relation  to  foreign   States,  their
subjects not within the allegiance, and action under municipal law in
relation to subjects [H.M. Seevai, Constitutional Law of India, (1984)
p. 1792].
d) Instances of “Act of State”
(a) During War
During   war   the   acts   of   a   sovereign   State   affecting   alien   are   not
cognizable  by   municipal   Courts.   In  Secretary  of  State  for  India  v.
Kamachee Boye [(1859) VII M.I.A. 476], the facts were that on the
death of Raja Shivaji of Tanjore, the East India Company seized the
public and private properties of the deceased Raja. The seizure was
made on the ground that the dignity of the Raja was extinct for want of
a male heir, and that the property of the late Raja lapsed to the British
Government. The widow claimed it as the legal heir of the deceased
Raja. The claim was accepted by the Supreme Court of Madras. But, on
appeal the Privy Council reversed and it was held that the seizure made
by the company on the death of last male Raja was an act of State,
which   could   not   be   questioned   before   a   municipal   Court.   The
transactions  of  independent States  are  governed by  laws  other  than
those which  municipal Courts administer. In this regard “Lord Kings
down observed”:
Page 62 of 116
HC-NIC Page 62 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
“Of the propriety or justice of that act, neither the Court below nor the
Judicial   Committee   has   the   means   of   forming,   or   the   right   of
expressing, if they had formed, any opinion. It may have been just or
unjust, politic or impolitic, beneficial or injurious taken as a whole to
those whose interests are affected. It is sufficient to say that, even if a
wrong has been done, it is a wrong for which no Municipal Court of
justice can afford a remedy.”
A   further   question   is   whether   a   State   is   bound   to   indemnify
citizens for the damage sustained during actual hostilities? The issue was
examined by the House of Lords in Burmah Oil Co. v. Lord Advocate
[(1965) AC 75]. The facts of this case if that the installations as well as
the petrol were destroyed, to prevent its falling into the hands of the
advancing Japanese army. It was clear that, the destruction was carried
out on the orders of the Crown in the lawful exercise of its prerogative
power to provide for the defense of British territory. The question that
fell for decision by the House of Lords was whether the Crown must pay
compensation. The House of Lords held that if property of the subject
was damaged by the State during actual hostilities, no compensation
need be given. The plaintiffs had claimed the full value of the property
destroyed, which might have amounted to more than £30,000,000. In
that   case,   Lord   Reid   pointed   out   that   the   appellants   appear   to   be
claiming the  full value of these  installations in  time of peace. I am
holding that they are entitled to compensation and it will be necessary to
consider whether compensation must not be related to their loss, in the
sense of what difference it would have made to them if their installations
had been allowed to fall into the hands of the enemy instead of being
destroyed.   Lord   Pearce   also   dealt   with   the   point   thus  “There   may,
however, well be a distinction in terms of compensation. Petrol which is
Page 63 of 116
HC-NIC Page 63 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
taken and used may be worth its full value. Petrol which is blown up
when   it   is   about   to   pass   into   the   hands   of   an   enemy,   who   will
undoubtedly consume it without paying the owner, may be valueless.
That matter has not been argued and is not yet relevant”.
Lord Radcliffe, dissented and held that the State should not be
asked to pay a requisition price for something for which there was at the
time no conceivable purchaser.
Thus the common law rule is that seizure or destruction of private
property within the realm under prerogative power, even during grave
national emergency, if not during actual hostilities could be done only
on   the   footing   that   compensation   was   payable.   The   decision   was
immediately nullified by the War Damages Act, 1965, which prevented
the   payment   of   compensation   in   such   or  similar  circumstances.  The
Assam High Court in  Union of India  v.  Ramkamal [AIR (1953) Ass.
116]  examined   this   aspect.   The  respondent   was   a   lessee   of   certain
fisheries. He had constructed fish­nurseries with auxillary installations.
In the year 1944, a party of Indian and British soldiers occupied the
western half of the northern and the western banks of the fisheries.
During this period serious damage was caused to the fishery. The trial
Court   decreed   the   suit   and   awarded   damages   of   Rs.77.000/­   with
proportionate costs against the Union of India.  On appeal, the Assam
High Court held that acts in the exercise of sovereign power of the State
in time of war, insurrection, rebellion or any other emergency of a like
character, affecting the person or the property of the subjects should also
enjoy immunity. However, it was held that the State should satisfy the
Court as to the necessity and reasonableness of the action before it could
claim   recognition   of   immunity.   It   means   that   the   necessity   and   the
reasonableness of the sovereign act are subject to judicial scrutiny. In the
instant case, no evidence was produced on behalf of the State to prove
Page 64 of 116
HC-NIC Page 64 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the gravity of the emergency justifying the occupation without recourse
to the provisions of the municipal law contained in the Defense of India
Act. Occupation by the troops in such circumstances amounted to an act
of trespass.
Thus Union of India was held liable to compensate the plaintiff
respondent,     Ram   Labhaya   C.J.  Observed:  “Indian   decisions   do   not
support the contention that the expression “act of State” refers only to
acts against foreigners or foreign States. The expression has been used in
relations to all acts of the sovereign authority whether they operated
extra­territorially or whether they were acts between the State and its
own   subjects.   No   distinction   has   been   made   between   acts   of   the
sovereign authority affecting foreign States or foreigners and those affect
the citizens of the State.
The   division   of   sovereignty   into   two   compartments   which   has
taken place in England for purpose of convenience has not been adopted
in India. The difficulty in adopting this division was probably historical”.
It seems that the law in India is also similar to that available in
England. The learned Chief Justice had evolved the test of necessity and
reasonableness   of  the   action   for   claiming   immunity.   Though   it   is
impossible for a Court of law to access the necessity and reasonableness
of a military action, the test in practice means that if done during actual
hostilities the State may claim immunity.
b. International Treaties
An act of State includes signing of treaties. It can only be done by
a  sovereign and not by a private person. In State of Kerala  v.  Ravi
Varma Raja Menon, [AIR 1964 Ker. 123], the Kerala High Court held
Page 65 of 116
HC-NIC Page 65 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
that, the formation of United States of Travancore and Cochin was an
act of State as it was the result of a covenant entered into by the rulers
of   Travancore,   Cochin.   Also   in  Nawab   of   Carnatic  v.  East   India
Company [4  Bro  CC 198  (1793)] the   suit   brought   by   the   Nawab,
against the Company was dismissed on the ground that it was an act of
State as it was a matter of political treaty between two sovereigns.
c. Annexation or Cession of Territories
The   rule   that   cession   of   territory   or   annexation   of   territory   by   a
sovereign State is an act of State. In East India Company v. Syed Alley
[(1827) VII, M.oo.Ind. App. 555(1829)], it was held that resumption by
the Madras Government of a Jagir granted by former Nawabs, before the
date of the treaty, and a regrant by the Madras Government to another
for a life State only, was such an act of sovereign power by the East
India Company. So the Supreme Court at Madras was precluded from
taking cognizance of a suit by the heirs of the original grantee in respect
of such resumption. In State of Saurashtra v. Memon Haji Ismail [AIR
1959 SC 1583], the Nawab of Junagadh had gifted certain property to
the respondent. After the annexation of the State by the Indian Union,
the Administrator resumed those properties and the grantee brought a
suit against the State for the recovery of the price of those properties.
The Supreme Court rejected the suit on the ground that the sovereign
act of annexation could not be questioned before civil Courts.
When the princely States were merged into the Union of India, the
inhabitants of those States have raised problems as to their rights. The
question was how far the newly formed successor governments were
bound by the rights enjoyed by the inhabitants under the former rulers.
The law is that the prior rights will be recognized only if the successor
Page 66 of 116
HC-NIC Page 66 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
government had recognized them.  The rational of the rule has been
explained in  Nayak Vajesingji Joravarsingjai Naayk  v.  Secretary of
State [AIR 1924 PC 216],  where   the   Privy   Council  in   consolidated
appeals,   the   three   Nayaks   of   Tanda,   Chandwana   and   Katwada
respectively sued the Indian Government for a declaration that they are
proprietors of the whole land in the Talukas belonging to them and that
they are not bound to accept a lease of the same in the terms offered to
them   by   the   Government   in   1907.   In   this   case,   the  Privy   Council
observed „when a territory is acquired by a sovereign State for the first
time that is an “act of State”. It matters not how the acquisition has been
brought about. It may be by conquest, it may be by cession following a
treaty, it may be by occupation of territory hitherto unoccupied by a
recognized rule. In all cases, the result is the same. Any inhabitant of the
territory can only make good in the municipal Courts established by the
new sovereign, such rights as he had under the rules of predecessors will
avail him nothing. Even if in a treaty of cession it is stipulated that
certain inhabitants should enjoy certain rights that does not give a title
to these inhabitants to enforce these stipulation in the Municipal Courts.
The right to enforce remains only with the High Contracting Parties.
The above observation was followed by Lord Atkin in Secretary of
State v. Sardar Rustam Khan [AIR 1941 PC 64] where it was held that
as the Khan of Kalat had made over to the British State the whole of his
sovereign rights and by the terms of the treaty as well as by virtue of
Section 1 of Foreign Jurisdiction Act, 1890, the Government of India had
full sovereign rights over the territory in question and had the right to
recognize or not to recognize existing titles to land, the respondents
could enforce no claim against the Government in the municipal Courts.
The Supreme Court followed the view in  Dalmia Dadri Cement
Page 67 of 116
HC-NIC Page 67 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Company v. Income Tax Commissioner [AIR 1958 SC 816]. The Jind
State was merged into Patiala and East Punjab  States Union in 1948.
While the new State was formed all the laws operating in former States
were abrogated and the laws prevailing in the Patiala State were made
applicable to all the merged States. It became a Part B State of the
Indian Union and the Indian Income Tax Act was made applicable. The
Company claimed exemption from the imposition of income tax relying
on the exemption granted to it by the former ruler of Jind State. The
Court rejected the contention holding that the rights granted by the
former State could be enforced against the new State only if it accorded
recognition to them either by an affirmative declaration or conduct.
In Premsukhdas v. Rajasthan [AIR 1967 SC 40], the former State
of Bharatpur had allowed certain concessions of 25 per cent reduction
from custom duties for those persons who purchased plots in a colony in
Bharatpur to do business. The intention was to develop that area by
encouraging   people   to   settle   there.   On   this   condition   the   appellant
purchased plot in that area. But when the Bharatpur State was merged
in the State of Rajasthan, the latter State repudiated the concession and
enacted uniform customs duties  throughout the  State. The appellant
filed a suit for recovery of excess custom duties which he had been
compelled to pay on account of disallowance of concessions given by the
former State of Bharatpur. The Supreme Court rejected the claim on the
ground that the contractual liability of a former State was binding on a
succeeding sovereign State only if it recognized the contractual liability.
In  Pramod Chandra Deb  v.  Orissa [AIR 1962 SC 1288],  the former
ruler had given certain maintenance grants to the junior  members of
their   families.   The   Supreme   Court   held   that   those   grants   could   be
enforced   against   the   Government   of   India   in   so   far   as   they   were
recognized by it. There were four such grants of which three had been
Page 68 of 116
HC-NIC Page 68 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
recognized by the Government. The fourth grant had been annulled by
an order issued under the Extra Provincial Jurisdiction Act, 1947 and
that grant was held to be unenforceable. In  Gwalior R.S. (W) Co.  v.
India [AIR 1960 MP 330] the Gwalior Maha Rajah, by his order dated
18.1.1947 had given exemption from income tax for a period of twelve
years to Birla Brothers in the Gwalior State, when they set up new
industries and factories there. In pursuance of the Order, the Gwalior
State Government had entered into an agreement with the Birla Brothers
subsequently the State was merged into Madhya Bharat. Income tax
assessment proceedings were launched by the Madhya Bharat State and
later by the Central Government. The company claimed exemption on
the ground of the order of exemption and the subsequent agreement
entered   into   with   the   State   Government.   The   Madhya   Bharat   High
Court, allowed the claim of exemption on the ground that an obligation
was cast on the Gwalior Government to give exemption which in turn
devolved   on   the   Central   Government   under   Act   205(1).   The   Indian
Income Tax Act did not abrogate specific exemption already granted to
the petitioner by special statutory provisions and virtually  the Union
Government   and   its   predecessor   Government   had   recognised   the
plaintiff s  ‟ claim.
In Virendra Singh v. State of U.P. [AIR 1954 SC 447], the Court
took different view of the effect of conquest or cession on private rights.
Here the ruler of Sarilla, granted village Rijura to the petitioner  on
January 5, 1948, and the ruler of Charkari and Sarilla, agreed to unite
into   the   United   State   of   Vindhya   Pradesh.   While   this   union   was   in
existence, certain officials of the Government interfered with the rights
of the petitioners but the Government of the United State of Vindhya
Pradesh   issued   orders   directing   the   officers   to   abstain   from   such
interference. Subsequently, the territory was ceded to the Dominion of
Page 69 of 116
HC-NIC Page 69 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
India, which thereafter constituted the area into a Chief Commissioner’s
Province for the purpose of administration; but the four villages granted
to the petitioner were detached from the centrally administered State
and absorbed into the State of Uttar Pradesh. On August 29, 1952, the
Governor of Uttar Pradesh revoked the  grants made in favour of the
petitioner. The Supreme Court rejected the plea of “act of State  holding ‟
there can be no “act of State” by a sovereign State as against its own
subjects. In this case, it was held the plaintiff having become a citizen of
India; he could enforce his property rights under Articles 19 and 31.
But, the decision of Virendra Singh was overruled by a bench of
seven judges of Supreme Court in Gujarat v. Vora Fiddali [AIR 1964 SC
1043], the facts of the case were that the Ruler of the Sant State ceded
the territory of his State to India by an agreement of merger on March
19, 1948. Later, it became a part of the Province of Bombay from August
1, 1949. A week before ceding the State territory to India, the ruler of
Sant made a tharao by which holders of certain villages were given full
rights and authority over the forests in the villages under the rules. Some
of these holders executed contracts in favour of the plaintiffs between
May  1948 and 1950. After merger the question arose whether those
contracts should be approved or not. Considering that the tharao made
by the ruler transferring the forest rights was malafide, the Government
of Bombay cancelled the tharao on July, 1949. Before the High Court the
plaintiffs succeeded on the ground that the agreement being law was
protected by article 372 of the constitution and could not be abrogated
by an executive act of the State Government. The Supreme Court by
majority held that Virendra Singh was wrongly decided. The tharao was
held to be not “law”. The Court also held that the integration of Indian
States with the  Dominion of India was act of State and the Central
Page 70 of 116
HC-NIC Page 70 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Government could refuse to recognize the rights created on the  eve of
merger by the tharao of the Ruler of Sant State and say that it was not
acceptable to them and therefore not binding on them.
The rule was applied to termination of services of employees of
former State by  the Successor State. In  Amarsingh v.  Rajasthan [AIR
1958 SC 231],  the appellant was a District and Sessions Judge in the
former Bikaner State. The integration of the State of Bikaner into the
new   State   of   Rajasthan   necessarily   involved   reorganization   of   the
various   services   in   the   several   integrating   States.   When   the   final
reorganization   was   brought   into   force   the   appellant   was   appointed
subsequently as Civil Judge. He was placed in Group C (Civil Judges and
Munsiffs) and placed at No. 18 in the list of junior posts. His pay and
emoluments   were   as   before   and   he   retained   the   same   grading.   His
earned increments were not affected, and except for the change in name,
his conditions of service were not worse than that in the service of the
former State. In the writ petition, he contended that under the guarantee
given by the United States of Rajasthan, he was entitled to be posted as a
District and Sessions Judge in the new set up and that he had been
reduced in rank in violation of Article 311. The Supreme Court held that
no question of reduction in rank attracting Article 311 was involved
because   all   his   previous   postings   in   the   New   State   were   purely
temporary; and so far as Article  XIV(1) of the Covenant was concerned
its guarantee had been fulfilled [Followed in Cipriani v. Union of India,
AIR 1969 Goa 76].
39 It is true that extreme cases are easy to recognise; such as acts of
war or ‘hot pursuit’ of a foreign ship as example of sovereign functions
on the one hand, and carriage of goods and passengers for reward or
Page 71 of 116
HC-NIC Page 71 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
sale of commodities as examples of commercial activities on the other
hand. In between these two extremes, innumerable examples can be
cited where it will not be easy to draw any rational or clear distinction
between sovereign acts (acts jure imperii) and commercial activities (acts
jure   gestionis).   It   is   because   of   this   difficulty   and   the   inequity   of
exempting   the   State   from   private   law   obligations   that   it   has   been
increasingly recognised in most jurisdictions that an unlimited claim of
State immunity from legal proceedings has no theoretical or legal basis.
That is the reason why the Crown Proceedings Act, 1947 drastically
curtailed the operation of the doctrine of immunity in England.
40  The doctrine of absolute immunity never formed part of classical
law. Neither Gortius [De Jure Belli ac Pacis (Carnegie edition, 1913)]
nor Bynkershoek [Quaestiones Juris Publici (Carnegie edition, 1930)]
nor Vattel [Droits des Gens, Book III Ch. 15] accepted the doctrine in its
absolute form, [See the Judgment of Lord Reid in Burmah Oil Co. Ltd.
v. Lord Advocate (1965) A.C. 75] Nor does it find acceptance in modern
jurisprudence?. The doctrine is now confined to narrow regions, namely,
(a) the immunity of a foreign State from the jurisdiction of the local
courts in regard to acts jure imperil (non­commercial activities of States
in   its   sovereign   capacity)   as   distinguished   from   acts  jure   gestionis
(commercial activities of State); and (b) the immunity of a State from
the jurisdiction of its own courts in regards to acts of state and matters
arising   from   military   operations.   The   principle   of   State   immunity   ­
whether of the territorial state or of the foreign state ­ is a survival of the
period when the sovereign was considered to be above the law. This is
no longer the position. [For a survey of legislation and judicial practice
in common law and civil law countries, see Lauterpacht, op. Cit. See
H.M. Seevai, Constitutional Law of India, 2nd  Ed. Vol. II pp. 1137­
1139, See also State of West Bengal v. Corporation of Calcutta (AIR
Page 72 of 116
HC-NIC Page 72 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
1967 SC 997)].
41 In the United Kingdom the principle of State immunity from the
jurisdiction of the British Courts was founded on the doctrine of royal
prerogative which in the words of Dicey [Law of the Constitution, 10th
ed., p.  424.  ?See War  Damages Act,  1965,  reversing in  effect the
decision of the House of Lords in Burmah Oil Co. Ltd. v. Lord Advocate
(1965) A.C. 75, H.L. Sc.]  is “The residue of discretionary or arbitrary
authority, which at any given time is legally left in the hands of the
crown.” Prerogative in its absolute form is no longer recognised in that
country except in matters arising from war in which the sovereign was
or   is   engaged   or   from   act   of   state.  [See War Damages Act, 1965,
reversing in effect the decision of the House of Lords in Burmah Oil Co.
Ltd. v. Lord Advocate (1965) A.C. 75, H.L. Sc.] [The doctrine of act of
state cannot be pleaded in a British Court as a defence against a
citizen or a resident alien who is the subject of a friendly state, Nissan
v.   Attoreny   General   (1970)   A.C.   179   (H.L.E.)   and   the   various
authorities cited therein.]. If property belonging to a citizen is taken or
damaged or destroyed under orders of the crown, albeit in the exercise
of the prerogative power, the owner of the property is entitled to be
compensated unless such loss arose from war damage. [Burmah Oil Co.
Ltd. v. Lord Advocate (1965) A.C. 75 (H.L.(Sc.) ), and War Damages
Act, 1965.]  Subject to such defence, the crown is no longer protected
from claims for compensation for the act of its servant if such act was
performed   negligently   or  ultra   vires  the   statute   creating   the   powers
under which it is purported to have been done. [Home Office v. Dorset
Yacht Co. (1970) A.C. 1004 H.L. (E); See the judgments of Lord Reid
and Lord Diplock.]
42 In a republican and democratic form of Government, as we have
Page 73 of 116
HC-NIC Page 73 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
under   our   constitution,   there   is   no   justification   for   recognising   the
archaic   theory   of   sovereign   immunity   which   was   founded   on   the
feudalistic notions of justice in England. It is highly doubtful whether
such doctrine had ever struck roots in the jurisprudence of our country,
for, as pointed out by the Supreme Court in     State of Rajasthan v. Mst.
Vidhyawathi (1962) Supp 2 SCR 989 : (AIR 1962 SC 933)    . In India
ever since the time of the East India Company, the sovereign has been
held liable to be sued in tort or in contract, and the Common Law
immunity never operated in India.”
43 All powers vested in the State are derived from the Constitution or
the   relevant   statute.   Under   the   Constitution,   there   is   no   scope   for
immunity based on any prerogative or arbitrary right. Any such right is
alien to our system. Ours is a Government of laws and not of men.
Except where special provisions have been made under the Constitution
(e.g. Article 361), or a reasonable classification is made under a statute,
treating the State or certain individuals as a special class and conferring
upon them special privileges and exemptions or immunities, against a
citizen the State has no right to immunity. The State is not protected
from liability for the tortious act of its servant which is either     ultra vires
the statute granting the powers under which he is purported to have
acted or is a negligent exercise of such powers:     Home Office v. Dorset
Yacht Co. Ltd. (1970) A.C. 1004 H.L. (E); per Lord Blackburn in
Geddis v. Proprietors of Bann Reservoir (1878) 3 A. C. 430, 456.      In
other   words   the   state   is   vicariously   liable   to   third   parties   in   such
circumstances as would render a private employer liable.
44 The concept of sovereignty is not a satisfactory test for deciding
the questions of immunity. The sovereign exercise of power is not the
dividing line between jurisdiction and immunity. As stated earlier, apart
Page 74 of 116
HC-NIC Page 74 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
from   the   constitutional   or   statutory   provisions   granting   certain
immunities   or   exemptions   or   privileges   to   the   State   or   its
instrumentalities and with the exception of matters arising from war
damage, the State, in relation to its citizens, has no immunity from
liability or from the jurisdiction of its courts.
45 In the aforesaid context, I may refer to and rely upon a decision of
the   Supreme   Court   in   the   case   of  Agricultural   Market   Produce
Committee vs. Ashok  Harikuni  and another [AIR  2000 SC 3116],
wherein the Supreme Court has explained what are the sovereign and
non­sovereign functions. The Supreme Court observed in paras 21, 22,
23, 31, 32 and 33 as under:
“21.  In relation to what are “sovereign”  and what are “non­sovereign”
functions,   this   Court   in  Chief Conservator of Forests v. Jagannath
Maruti Kondhare, (1996) 2 SCC 293 : (1996 AIR SCW 735 : AIR
1996 SC 2898 : 1996 Lab IC 967) holds (Paras 12 and 13) :
“We may not go by the labels. Let us reach the hub. And the same is
that the dichotomy of sovereign and non­sovereign functions does
not really exist ­ it would all depend on the nature of the power and
manner of its exercise, as observed in para 23 of Nagendra Rao case
(1994 AIR SCW 3753 : AIR 1994 SC 2663). As per the decision in
this   case,   one   of   the   tests   to   determine   whether   the   executive
function is sovereign in nature is to find out whether the State is
answerable for such action in Courts of law. It was stated by Sahai,
J. that acts like defence of the country, raising armed forces and
maintaining   it,   making   peace  or  war,  foreign  affairs,   power  to
acquire and retain territory, are functions which are indicative of
external sovereignty and are political in nature. They are, therefore,
not amenable to the jurisdiction of ordinary civil Court inasmuch
as the State is immune from being sued in such matters. But then,
according to this decision the immunity ends there. It was then
observed that in a welfare State, functions of the State are not only
the   defence   of   the   country   or   administration   of   justice   or
maintaining   law   and   order   but   extends   to   regulating   and
controlling   the   activities   of   people   in   almost   every   sphere,
educational,   commercial,   social,   economic,   political   and   even
martial. Because of this the demarcating line between sovereign and
non­sovereign powers has largely disappeard.
Page 75 of 116
HC-NIC Page 75 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
The   aforesaid   shows   that   if   we   were   to   extend   the   concept   of
sovereign function to include all welfare activities as contended on
behalf of the appellants, the ratio in Bangalore Water Supply case
(AIR 1978 SC 548 : 1978 Lab IC 467)  would get eroded,  and
substantially. We would demur to do so on the face of what was
stated in the aforesaid case according to which except the strictly
understood sovereign function. welfare activities of the State would
come within the purview of the definition of industry; and, not only
this, even within the wider circle of sovereign function, there may
be   an   inner   circle   encompassing   some   units   which   could   be
considered as industry if substantially severable.”
22. In other words, it all depends on the nature of power and the manner
of its exercise. What is approved to be “Sovereign” is defence of the country,
raising   armed   forces,   making   peace   or   war,   foreign   affairs,   power   to
acquire and retain territory. These are not amenable to the jurisdiction of
ordinary civil Courts. The other functions of the State including welfare
activity of State could not be construed as “sovereign” exercise of power.
Hence,   every   governmental   function   need   not   be   “sovereign”.   State
activities   are   multifarious.   From   the   primal   sovereign   power,   which
exclusively inalienably could be exercised by the Sovereign alone, which is
not subject to challenge in any civil Court to all the welfare activities,
which   would   be   undertaken   by   any   private   person.   So   merely   one   is
employee of statutory bodies would not take it outside the Central Act. If
that be then Section 2(a) of the Central Act read with Schedule I gives
large number of statutory bodies should have been excluded, which is not.
Even if a statute confers on any statutory body, any function which could
be construed   to  be “sovereign”  in nature  would   not  mean   every   other
functions under the same statute to be also sovereign. The Court should
examine   the   statute   to   severe   one   from   the   other   by   comprehensively
examining various provisions of that statute. In interpreting any statute to
find it is “industry” or not we have to find its pith and substance. The
Central   Act   is   enacted   to   maintain   harmony   between   employer   and
employee which brings peace and amity in its functioning. This peace and
amity should be the objective in the functioning of all enterprises. This is to
the   benefit   of   both,   employer   and   employee.   Misuse   of   rights   and
obligations by either or stretching it beyond permissible limits have to be
dealt with within the framework of the law but endeavor should not be in
all circumstances to exclude any enterprise from its ambit. That is why
Courts have been defining “industry” in the widest permissible limits and
“sovereign” functioning within its limited orbit.
23. In N. Negendra Rao and Co. v. State of A. P., (1994) 6 SCC 205 :
(1994 AIR SCW 3753 : AIR 1994 SC 2663), the question raised was
about the liability of the State to pay compensation for the negligence or
misfeasance on the part of its officers in discharge of their public duties
under a statute, which are incidental or ancillary and not primary or
Page 76 of 116
HC-NIC Page 76 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
inalienable  function of the State.  This decision holds that the State is
immuned only in cases where its officers perform primary or inalienable
functions   such   as   defence   of   the   country,   administration   of   justice,
maintenance of law and order. This Court held :
“A search or seizure effected under such law could be taken to be an
exercise of power which may be in domain of inalienable function.
Whether the authority to whom this power is delegated is liable for
negligence in discharge of duties while performing such functions is
a different matter. But when similar powers are conferred under
other   statute   as   incidental   or   ancillary   power   to   carry   out   the
purpose and objective of the Act, then it being an exercise of such
State function which is not primary or inalienable, an officer acting
negligently is liable personally and the State vicariously.
In   the   modern   sense   the   distinction   between   sovereign   or   nonsovereign
power thus does not exist. It all depends on the nature of
power and manner of its exercise. ……………. One of the tests to
determine  if the legislative  or executive  function  is sovereign  in
nature is whether the State is answerable for such actions in Courts
of law. For instance, acts such as defence of the country, raising
armed forces and maintaining  it, making  peace or war, foreign
affairs, power to acquire and retain territory, are functions which
are indicative of external sovereignty and are political in nature.
Therefore, they are not amenable to jurisdiction of ordinary civil
Court.”
“31. From the aforesaid catena of authorities, inalienability is one of the
basic   character   of   sovereignty.   The   Encyclopedia   of   the   American
Constitution with reference to “sovereignty” attempts to define sovereignty.
It records :
“Within the American regime the ultimate power and authority to
alter or a abolish the constitutions  of Government  of state and
Union   resides   only   and   inalienably   with   the   people.   If   it   be
necessary or useful to use the term “sovereignty” in the sense of
ultimate political power, then there is no sovereign in America but
the people.
DENNIS J. MAHONEY”
32. Words and Phrases, Permanent Edition, Volume 39­A with reference to
“sovereign power” records :
“The “sovereign powers” of a Government include all the powers
necessary   to   accomplish   its   legitimate   ends   and   purposes.   Such
powers   must   exist   in   all   practical   Governments.   They   are   the
Page 77 of 116
HC-NIC Page 77 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
incidents of sovereignty, of which a state cannot devest itself. Boggs
v. Meree Min. Co., 14 Cal, 279, 309 …………. In all Governments of
constitutional limitations “sovereign power” manifests itself in but
three ways.  By exercising  the right of taxation;  by the right  of
eminent domain; and through its police power.  United States v.
Douglas­Willan Sartoris Co., 22 p. 92, 96, 3 Wyo. 287.”
33.   So,   sovereign   function   in   the   new   sense   may   have   very   wide
ramification but essentially sovereign functions are primary inalienable
functions which only State could exercise. Thus, various functions of the
State,   may   be   ramifications   of   ‘sovereignty’   but   they   all   cannot   be
construed as primary inalienable functions. Broadly it is taxation, eminent
domain and police power which covers its field. It may cover its legislative
functions, administration of law, eminent domain, maintenance  of law
and   order,   internal   and   external   security,   grant   of   pardon.   So,   the
dichotomy between sovereign and non­sovereign function could be found
by finding which of the functions of the State could be undertaken by any
private person or body. The one which could be undertaken cannot be
sovereign function. In a given case even in subject on which the State has
the monopoly may also be non­sovereign in nature. Mere dealing in subject
of monopoly of the State would not make any such enterprise sovereign in
nature. Absence of profit making or mere quid pro would also not make
such enterprise to be outside the ambit of “industry” as also in State of
Bombay case (AIR 1960 SC 610) (supra).”
46 In India the doctrine of sovereign immunity found reference in
certain decisions. In Kasturi Lal v. State of U.P. [AIR 1965 SC 1039],
the Supreme Court held that the State is not liable if the wrongful act
was  committed   by its  employees “in   exercise  of  delegated  sovereign
power”. The subsequent decisions of the Supreme Court have narrowed
down   the   scope   and   sphere   of   sovereign   immunity.   The   defence   of
sovereign immunity is not available when the State or its officers acting
in the course of employment infringe a person’s fundamental right of life
and personal liberty as guaranteed by Article 21 of the Constitution. The
decisions commencing from Rudul Shah v. State of Bihar [AIR 1983 SC
1086], have greatly undermined and eroded the concept of sovereign
immunity and have laid more emphasis on the principle that if a tortious
act   has   been   committed   causing   injury   to   any   person   he   would   be
entitled   to   claim   reasonable   compensation   from   the   State   for   the
Page 78 of 116
HC-NIC Page 78 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
wrongful act done by its employees. It is by now well settled that the
State   is   responsible   for   the   tortious   act   of   its   employees.   The
compensation for violation of fundamental rights can be awarded in
exercise of the writ jurisdiction by the Supreme Court and the High
Court. The Civil Court can also award damages to a person aggrieved by
wrongful act of the employees of the State. The maintenance of law and
order and repression of crime are the traditional sovereign functions of
the State and the doctrine of sovereign immunity must be confined to
that sphere alone. In that field also the State can be held liable to pay
compensation   to   its   citizens   if   their   fundamental   rights   have   been
violated   and   they   suffered   injuries   on   that   account.   The   ideal   of   a
welfare State is that it must take care of those who are unable to help
themselves.   The   innocent   victims   must   be   provided   succour   and
reasonable compensation. The society as a whole and the  people in
whom the real sovereignty vests are the insurers of such victims.
47 In N. Nagendra Rao v. State of Andhra Pradesh [AIR 1994 SC
2663], the Supreme Court has observed that in the modern sense the
distinction between sovereign or non­sovereign power does not exist. No
civilized system can permit an executive to play with the people of its
country   and   claim   that   it   is   entitled   to   act   in   any   manner   as   it   is
sovereign. The concept of public interest has changed with structural
change in the society. No legal or political system today can place the
State above law as it is unjust and unfair for a citizen to be deprived of
his property illegally by negligent act of officers of the State without any
remedy.   From   sincerity,   efficiency   and   dignity   of   State   as   a   juristic
person, propounded in Nineteenth Century as sound sociological basis
for State immunity the circle has gone round and the emphasis now is
more on liberty, equality and the rule of law. The modern social thinking
of progressive societies and the judicial approach is to do away with
Page 79 of 116
HC-NIC Page 79 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
archaic State protection and place the State or the Government at par
with any other juristic legal entity. Any watertight compartmentalization
of   the   functions   of   the   State   as   “sovereign   and   non­sovereign”   or
“governmental and non­governmental” is not sound. It is contrary to
modern   jurisprudential   thinking.   The   need   of   the   State   to   have
extraordinary   powers   cannot   be   doubted.   But   with   the   conceptual
change of statutory power being statutory duty for sake of society and
the people, the claim of a common man or ordinary citizen cannot be
thrown out merely because it was done by an officer of the State even
though it was against law and negligently. Needs of the State, duty of its
officials and right of the citizen are required to be reconciled so that the
rule   of   law   in   a   welfare   State   is   not   shaken.  In   the   welfare   State,
functions   of   the   State   are   not   only   defence   of   the   country   or
administration of justice or maintaining law and order but it extends to
regulating and controlling the activities of people in almost every sphere,
educational, commercial, social, economic, political and even marital.
The demarcating line between sovereign and non­sovereign powers for
which   no   rational   basis   survives   has   largely   disappeared.   Therefore,
barring functions such as administration of justice, maintenance of law
and order and repression of crime etc. which are among the primary and
inalienable functions of a constitutional Government, the State cannot
claim any immunity. Maintenance of law and order or repression of
crime may be inalienable function, for proper exercise of which the State
may enact a law and may delegate its functions, the violation of which
may not be sueable in torts, unless it trenches into and encroaches on
the fundamental rights of life and liberty guaranteed by the Constitution.
But that   principle  would  not  be  attracted  where  similar  powers are
conferred on officers who exercise statutory powers which are otherwise
than sovereign powers as understood in the modern sense. The suit for
damages for negligence of officers of State in discharging statutory duty
Page 80 of 116
HC-NIC Page 80 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
is maintainable, is also supported by Art. 300.
48 In Common Cause, a Registered Society v. Union of India [AIR
1999 SC 2979], a three Judge Bench of the Supreme Court affirmed the
principle of law mentioned above.
49 In State of A. P. v. C. R. Reddy [AIR 2000 SC 2083], it has been
observed that “the Maxim that King can do no wrong or that the Crown
is not answerable in tort has no place in Indian jurisprudence, where the
power   vests,   not   in   the   Crown,   but   in   the   people   who   elect   their
representatives to run the Government, which has to act in accordance
with the provisions of the Constitution and would be answerable to the
people for any violation thereof”. It is observed that “the Fundamental
Rights, which also include basic human rights, continue to be available
to a prisoner and those rights cannot be defeated by pleading the old
and archaic defence of immunity in respect of sovereign acts which has
been rejected several times by this Court”. It is further stated : “in this
process of judicial advancement,  Kasturi Lal’s case (supra)  has paled
into insignificance and is no longer of any binding value”. The Supreme
Court further proceeded to observe in paras 31 and 32 as under :­
“This Court, through a stream of cases, has already awarded compensation
to the persons who suffered personal injuries at the hands of the officers of
the Government including Police Officers and personnel for their tortious
act. Though most of these cases were decided under Public law domain, it
would not make any difference as in the instant case, two vital factors,
namely, police negligence as also the Sub­Inspector being in conspiracy are
established as a fact.”
“Moreover, these decisions, as for example,  Nilabti Behera v. State of
Orissa, AIR 1993 SC 1960. In Re : Death of Sawinder Singh Grover,
(1995) Supp (4) SCC 450 and D. K. Basu v. State of West Bengal, AIR
1997 SC 610,  would indicate that so far as Fundamental  Rights and
human   rights   or   human   dignity   are   concerned,   the   law   has   marched
ahead   like   a   Pegasus   but   the   Government   attitude   continues   to   be
conservative and it tries to defend its action or the tortious action of its
Page 81 of 116
HC-NIC Page 81 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
officers by raising the plea of immunity for sovereign acts or acts of State,
which must fail.”
50 The Supreme Court in  D.K.Basu v. State of West Bengal [AIR
1997 SC 610] has reiterated Smt. Nilabati Behera alias Lalita Behera (AIR
1993 SC 1960) as follows:­
“Till about two decades ago the liability of the Government for tortuous act
of its public servants was generally limited and the person affected could
enforce his right in tort by filing a civil suit and there again the defence of
sovereign immunity was allowed to have its play. For the violation of the
fundamental right to life or the basic human rights, however, this Court
has taken the view that the defence of sovereign immunity is not available
to   the   State   for   the   tortuous   acts   of   the   public   servants   and   for   the
established   violation   of   the   rights   guaranteed   by   Article   21   of   the
Constitution of the India. In Nilabati Behera v. State (1993 AIR SCW
2366) (supra) the decision of this Court in Kasturi Lal Ralia Ram Jain
v. State of U.P., (1965) 1 SCR 375 : (AIR 1965 SC 1039), wherein the
plea of sovereign immunity had been upheld in a case of vicarious liability
of the State for the tort committed by its employees was explained??..”
51 In  State of Andhra Pradesh v. Challa Ramkrishna Reddy and
others   [AIR   2000   SC   2083],  the   Supreme   Court   has   noticed  N.
Nagendra   Rao   and   Co.   v.   State   of   A.P.   AIR   1994   SC   2663  wherein
immunity of the State for sovereign functions has been explained as
follows:­
“But there the immunity ends. No civilized system can permit an executive
to play with the people of its country and claim that it is entitled to act in
any manner as it is sovereign. The concept of public interest has changed
with structural change in the society. No legal or political system today
can place the State above law as it is unjust and unfair for a citizen to be
deprived of his property illegally by negligent act of officers of the State
without any remedy. From sincerity, efficiency and dignity of State as a
juristic person, propounded in nineteenth century as sound sociological
basis for State immunity the circle has gone round and the emphasis now
is   more   on   liberty,   equality   and   the   rule   of   law.   The   modern   social
thinking of progressive societies and the judicial approach is to do away
with archaic State protection and place the State or the Government at par
Page 82 of 116
HC-NIC Page 82 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
with any other juristic legal entity. Any watertight compartmentalization
of   the   functions   of   the   State   as   `sovereign   and   non­sovereign’   or
`governmental or nongovernmental’ is not sound. It is contrary to modern
jurisprudential   thinking.   The   need   of   the   State   to   have   extraordinary
powers cannot be doubted. But with the conceptual change of statutory
power being statutory duty for sake of society and the people the claim of a
common man or ordinary citizen cannot be thrown but merely because it
was done by an officer of the State even though it was against law and
negligently. Needs of the State, duty of its officials and right of the citizens
are required to be reconciled so that the rule of law in a welfare State is
not shaken. Even in America where this doctrine of sovereignty found its
place either because of the `financial instability of the infant American
States rather than to the stability of the doctrine theoretical foundation’,
or because of `logical and practical ground’, or that `there could be no
legal right as against the State which made the law gradually gave way to
the   movement   from,   `State   irresponsibility   to   State   responsibility’.   In
welfare State, functions of the State are not only defence of the country or
administration of justice or maintaining law and order but it extends to
regulating and controlling the activities of people in almost every sphere,
educational, commercial, social, economic, political and even marital. The
demarcating line between sovereign and non­sovereign powers for which
no   rational   basis   survives,   has   largely   disappeared.   Therefore,   barring
functions such as administration of justice, maintenance of law and order
and repression of crime etc. which are among the primary and inalienable
functions   of   a  constitutional  Government,  the   State  cannot   claim   any
immunity.”
The Supreme Court ultimately has held as follows:­
“This Court, through a stream of cases, has already awarded compensation
to the persons who suffered personal injuries at the hands of the officers of
the Government including police officers and personnel for their tortuous
act. Though most of these cases were decided under public law domain, it
would not make any difference as in the instant case, two vital factors,
namely, police negligence as also the Sub­Inspector being in conspiracy are
established as a fact.
Moreover, these decisions, as far example,  Nilabati Behera v. State of
Orissa, (1993) 2 SCC 746: (1993) 2 SCR 581: AIR 1993 SC 1960:
(1993  AIR SCW 2366): In Re: Death of Sawinder Singh  Grover,
(1995) Supp (4) SCC 450: (1992) 6 JT (SC) 271: 1992(3) Scale
34(2); and D.K. Basu v. State of West Bengal, (1997) 1 SCC 416: AIR
1997 SC 610: (1997 AIR SCW 233),  would indicate  that so far as
fundamental rights and human rights or human dignity are concerned, the
law   has   marched   ahead   like   a   Pegasus   but   the   Government   attitude
continues to be conservative and it tries to defend its action or the tortuous
Page 83 of 116
HC-NIC Page 83 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
action of its officers by raising the plea of immunity for sovereign acts or
acts of State, which must fail.”
52 In State of Madhya Pradesh and another v. Smt. Shantibai and
another   [AIR   2005   MP   66]  on   the   question   whether   the   State
Government is not liable to pay damages because of the doctrine of
sovereign immunity, it has been held as follows:­
“…… In welfare State, functions of the State are not only defence of the
country or administration of justice or maintaining law and order but it
extends to regulating and controlling the activities of people in almost
every sphere, educational, commercial, social, economic, political and even
marital. The demarcating line between sovereign and non overeign powers
for which no rational basis survives, has largely disappeared. Therefore,
barring functions such as administration of justice, maintenance of law
and order and repression of crime etc. which are among the primary and
inalienable  functions  of a constitutional  Government,  the State cannot
claim any immunity. Maintenance of law and order or repression of crime
may be inalienable function, for proper exercise of which the State may
enact a law and may delegate its functions, the violation of which may not
be   sueable   in   torts,   unless   it   trenches   into   and   encroaches   on   the
fundamental rights of life and liberty guaranteed by the Constitution. But
that principle would not be attracted where similar powers are conferred
on   officers   who   exercise   statutory   powers   which   are   otherwise   than
sovereign powers as understood in the modern sense. The suit for damages
for   negligence   of   officers   of   State   in   discharging   statutory   duty   is
maintainable, is also supported by Art.300.
In view of the above legal position, the plea of sovereign immunity is not
available to the defendants in the present case. The plaintiffs sustained
injuries   at   the   hands   of   police   officers   even   though   unwittingly.   They
deserve some compensation from the State to repair the damage done to
them. They were innocent victims. The judgment and decree of the trial
court are unassailable.”
53 In the RFA No. 92 of 2001 with Cross­Objection No. 93 of 2001,
State of H.P. and another v. K.L. Malhotra and Ors. decided on 29th
August 2008, the same firing dated 27th September 1990 in Mandi town
was in question. In para 26 of the judgment, it has been held as follows:­
Page 84 of 116
HC-NIC Page 84 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
“The police and the administration was negligent in opening firing, which
killed  Karan Malhotra.  There  was gross violation  of Article  21 of the
Constitution. The State has no right to take away the life of a citizen
except by following due process of law. The servants of the State if take law
in their own hands and violate Article 21 of the Constitution then State is
liable   for   the   acts   of   its   servants   and   in   that   situation   cannot   seek
protection by pleading sovereign immunity. The servants of the State are
expected to deal with the public with care and caution. They should handle
the mob tactfully and should resort to force after careful assessment, firing
should be strictly in accordance with law and that too as a last resort. The
servants of the State cannot be permitted to take law in their own hands
under   the   shelter   of   sovereign   immunity.   In   view   of   facts   and
circumstances of the present case, the police had killed Karan Malhotra
son of respondents No. 1 and 2 without any provocation on the part of the
deceased.  It has not  been proved  on record  that  Karan Malhotra  had
indulged in any act which provoked the police to fire at him causing his
death. In these circumstances, the appellants have failed to bring their case
within the ambit of sovereign immunity,  in fact no case for sovereign
immunity has been made out by the State.”
54 Immunity of State for its sovereign acts is claimed on the basis of
the old English Maxim that the King can do no wrong. But even in
England, the law relating to immunity has undergone a change with the
enactment of Crown Proceedings Act, 1947. Considering the effect of
this Act, it is stated in Rattan Lal’s “Law of Torts” (23rd Edition) as
under:
“The Act provides that the Crown shall be subject to all those liabilities in
tort to which, if it were a person of full age and capacity, it would be
subject (1) in respect of torts committed by its servants or agents, provided
that the act or omission of the servant or agent would, apart from the Act,
have given rise to a cause of action in tort against that servant or agent or
against his estate; (2) in respect of any breach of those duties which a
person owes to his servants or agents at common law by reason of being
their employer; (3) in respect of any breach of the duties attaching at
common   law   to   the   ownership,   occupation,   possession   or   control   of
property.   Liability   in   tort   also   extends   to   breach   by   the   Crown   of   a
statutory  duty.  It is also  no  defence  for the  Crown  that  the tort  was
committed by its servants in the course of performing or purporting to
perform functions entrusted to them by any rule of the common law or by
statute. The law as to indemnity and contribution as between joint tortfeasors
shall be enforceable by or against the Crown and the Law Reform
(Contributory   Negligence)   Act,   1945   binds   the   Crown.   Although   the
Page 85 of 116
HC-NIC Page 85 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Crown Proceedings Act preserves the immunity of the Sovereign in person
and contains savings in respect of the Crown’s prerogative and statutory
powers, the effect of the Act in other respects, speaking generally, is to
abolish the immunity of the Crown in tort and to equate the Crown with a
private citizen in matters of tortious liability.”
55 Thus,   the   Crown   in   England   does   not   now   enjoy   absolute
immunity and may be held vicariously liable for the tortious acts of its
officers and servants.
56 The Maxim that King can do no wrong or that the Crown is not
answerable in tort has no place in Indian jurisprudence where the power
vests, not in the Crown, but in the people who elect their representatives
to   run   the   Government,   which   has   to   act   in   accordance   with   the
provisions of the Constitution and would be answerable to the people for
any violation thereof.
57 Right to Life is one of the basic human rights. It is guaranteed to
every person by Article 21 of the Constitution and not even the State has
the authority to violate that Right.
58 I have to my advantage a very erudite and lucid judgment on the
point in question delivered by a Division Bench of this Court in the case
of State of Gujarat vs. Govindbhai Jakhubhai and another [AIR 1999
Gujarat 316]. In the said case, the plaintiff had undertaken work as a
Contractor for the construction of Rajendranagar Dam. The respondent
No.2   before   this   Court,   who   was   the   original   defendant   No.2,   was
working as a police constable at the Raigadh Outpost and was in the
service   of   the   appellant   –   State   of   Gujarat,   who   was   the   original
defendant No.1. On 22nd April 1976, after the close of the work for the
day, the plaintiff was proceeding to Himatnagar for purchasing a kingpin
for his damaged truck and when he was passing by the Raigadh Police
Page 86 of 116
HC-NIC Page 86 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Outpost, situated on the highway, he came to know that the truck driver
was carrying some of his labourers in his truck. He learnt that his truck
driver was detained in the Outpost and was being manhandled. The
plaintiff, therefore, went inside the Police Outpost and requested the
constable, defendant No.2, to desist from beating the driver, asking him
that he may take legal action as may be warranted, but should not take
law into his own hands. The defendant No.2 – constable got annoyed
and excited. He started abusing the plaintiff and gave him threats. He
asked another policeman to bring his rifle from the adjoining room, and
on getting the rifle, he continued his hostility towards the plaintiff and
before the plaintiff could run away, he fired a shot at him, which hit the
plaintiff on his right thigh above the knee­cap. Despite treatment at the
Civil Hospital, the wound did not heal and the plaintiff had to get his
right leg amputated above the knee­cap. The plaintiff filed a suit for
damages on the premises that the act of the defendant No.2 was a
tortious act for which the State was vicariously liable. The Trial Court on
the basis of the evidence on record decreed the suit rejecting the defence
that the State was not vicariously liable because the act was relatable to
the   sovereign   powers   of   the   State.   The   State   of   Gujarat,   being
dissatisfied   with   the   decree   passed   by   the   Trial   Court,   preferred   an
appeal before this Court. Affirming the judgment and decree passed by
the Trial Court and dismissing the First Appeal filed by the State of
Gujarat, a Division Bench of this Court held as under:
“11.1. The security of man’s person is the most elementary of civil rights.
Even a Constable would be liable in tort like any other citizen for any
unlawful interference with the person or liberty of another in the same
manner as a private citizen would be. Actual violence inflicted on a person
results in deprivation of the basic right of life which is guaranteed as a
fundamental right under Art. 21 of the Constitution. A direct application
of physical force to a person of another, whether inflicted with any weapon
or missile is battery, when it be done either intentionally or negligently.
Battery falls in the category of tort known as trespass to the person; the
Page 87 of 116
HC-NIC Page 87 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
other two in that category being assault and false imprisonment. In an
action of trespass to the person, once the trespass is admitted or proved, it
would be for the defendant to justify the trespass, if he can, on the defences
available to him under the law, such as, that the defendant was acting in
defence   of   his   person   or   property   or   using   reasonable   force   in   the
prevention of crime or stopping a breach of peace or in effecting lawful
arrest or using permissible force under the law.
11.2. The question that arises before us is when a person is deprived of his
fundamental   right   to   life   or   personal   liberty,   except   according   to   the
procedure established by law, by police and the wrong done is actionable,
is the State responsible for such deprivation caused by a wrongful  act
committed by a member of the police force.
11.3.  It is a rule of law that an employer,  though  guilty  of no fault
himself, is liable for the damage done by the fault or negligence of his
servant acting in the course of his employment (Per Lord Reid in Staveley
Iron and Chemical Co. v. Jones, (1956) AC 627 at 643. On the other
hand, if it is established that master himself owed a duty to the plaintiff
and that duty has been broken by the act of the servant, the master will be
liable  for his primary  liability  and  not  vicarious  liability.  In England,
Crown immunity in tort was brought to an end by the Crown Proceedings
Act, 1947, which by Section 2 subjected Crown to all those liabilities in
tort to which, if it were a private person of full age and capacity, it would
be subject; in respect of torts submitted by its servants or agents; in respect
of any breach of those duties which a person owes to his servant or agents
at common law by reason of being their employer; and in respect of any
breach   of   the   duties   attaching   at   common   law   to   the   ownership,
occupation, possession or control of property. Thus, the Crown is made
vicariously liable to third parties for torts committed by its servants in the
course of their employment, if committed in circumstances which would
render a private employer liable. It was also provided that the Crown was
not to be liable, unless the act or omission in question would, apart from
the Act, have given rise to a cause of action in tort against the servant or
agent. This preserves such defences as acts of state and the exercise of
statutory or prerogative powers but it does not protect the Crown from
liability for the tortious act of its servant which is ultra vires the statute
creating the powers under which the act is purported to be done, nor does
it protect the Crown from the negligent exercise by its servant of such
powers.  (See   Clerk   and   Lindsell   on   Torts,   Fourteenth   Edition,
Paragraph 153 at page 87).
11.4. In England by Section 48 of the Police Act, 1944 the Chief Officer of
the Police for any police area is made liable in respect of torts committed
by constables in the like manner as a master is liable in respect of torts
committed by his servants in the course of their employment.
Page 88 of 116
HC-NIC Page 88 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
12. Any police atrocity, be it custodial or otherwise, which results in death
of   or   injury   to   a   person   is   per   se   a   violation   of   fundamental   right
guaranteed by Article 21 of the Constitution.  The defence of sovereign
immunity would in such cases be alien to the concept of guarantee of the
fundamental right to life and personal liberty. Assault or battery, when
committed by the State­agency would be a violation of the fundamental
right to life guaranteed by Article 21. The doctrine of sovereign immunity
of the State would be subject to the constitutional mandate enjoining a
duty on the State not to deprive any person of his life or personal liberty
without  following  the procedure  established  by law.  Causing  injury  or
death by police excesses would be a clear violation of such right and such
wrongful acts even if referable to the sovereign functions of the State of
maintenance of law and order will not immune the State from its strict
liability which arises due to the violation of the fundamental right to life
and personal liberty. The State must in such cases adequately compensate
for the wrong done irrespective of the fact that it was done by the employee
during   the   course   of   employment,   which   is   relatable   to   the   sovereign
functions of the State, such as maintenance of law and order.
13.   Tort   committed   by   a   State   employee   resulting   in   violation   of
fundamental right would be an actionable wrong for which a remedy lies
in Civil Court for damages to compensate the victim. The fact that a public
law remedy lies under Articles 32 and 226 of the Constitution before the
Superior Courts in respect of torts committed by police for which State is
liable on the principle of strict liability when there is violation of the
fundamental right to life under Article 21, would not take away the power
of civil Court to grant relief of damages for violation of fundamental rights
by the State agency by committing such tort. The ordinary civil Courts
have jurisdiction in all matters of civil nature. As provided by Section 9 of
the Code of Civil Procedure, the Courts shall, subject to the provisions
contained in the Code, have jurisdiction to try all suits of a civil nature
excepting suits of which their cognizance is either expressly or impliedly
barred. Violation of fundamental right to life by committing a tort would,
therefore, constitute a valid cause of action to seek redressal in a civil
Court. Such violation by tortious act of the police being an actionable
wrong can be tried in a civil Court and a large portion of the population of
the   rural   area   of   this   vast   country   would   find   it   more   convenient   to
approach the civil Courts in their local area rather than to rush to the
High Court or the Supreme Court for invoking their extraordinary writ
powers.   Suits  for  compensation   against   the  State   Government  are not
excluded from the jurisdiction of the civil Court. Therefore, in a suit for
damages for a tort committed by an employee of the State, where the
liability of the State arises, the civil Court has jurisdiction to pass a decree
for   damages   against   the   State.   In  case   of  an  establishment   breach   of
fundamental rights, the liability of the State is a strict liability and no
question of pleading a defence of sovereign functions can now arise in face
of the Constitutional protection of the fundamental rights which enjoins a
Page 89 of 116
HC-NIC Page 89 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
duty on the State not to violate them. Therefore, when the said defence is
not available in context of the established breach of fundamental rights,
the civil Court can award damages for such violation against the State for
the tort committed by the police during the course of employment, even
though   the   maintenance   of   law   and   order   may   be   in   the   nature   of
sovereign functions of the State.
13.2.  The  Civil  Court   obviously  has  to  determine  whether   the  tort  in
question committed by the State employee violates the fundamental right
of the person.  When the plaintiff establishes that the police  man has,
during   the   course   of   his   employment,   caused   physical   harm   such   as
battery, that by itself is sufficient proof of violation of fundamental right to
life even if the expression ‘fundamental right’ is not used in respect of such
harm. The fundamental  rights are all­pervasive and do not depend on
whether they are so described. When physical harm is wrongfully caused
by the State agency, it amounts to violation of the right to life and it does
not require a label to become such violation. Therefore, mere non­mention
of Article 21 in the pleadings will not defeat a claim where the facts proved
clearly establish that the fundamental right to life is in fact violated. In
other   words,   when   a  person  pleads   and   proves   that   he  was   tortured,
maimed or assaulted by the police wrongfully, that established fact itself
means that the fundamental right of that person to life is violated and
even   if   he   had   not   added   the   surplusage   to   the   effect:   “therefore   my
fundamental right under Article 21 is violated”, it nonetheless remains a
violation of his fundamental right under Article 21 and he cannot be nonsuited
on the ground that there is no pleading or issue to that effect.
14. We gain support for our above conclusions from the decision of the
Hon’ble Supreme Court in  D. K. Basu v. State of W. B., reported in
(1997) 1 SCC 416 : (AIR 1997 SC 610) in which the Supreme Court
held that custodial violence, including torture and death in the lockups,
strikes a blow at the rule of law, which demands that the powers of the
executive should not only be derived from law but also that the same
should be limited by law. Custodial violence is a matter of concern. It is
aggravated by the fact that it is committed by persons who are supposed to
be the protectors of the citizens.  The protection  of an individual  from
torture and abuse by the police and other law­enforcing officers is a matter
of deep concern in a free society, observed the Supreme Court. The question
before the Supreme Court was whether monetary compensation should be
awarded   for   established   infringement   of   the   fundamental   rights
guaranteed under Articles 21 and 22 of the Constitution of India. It was
observed: “Whether it is physical assault or rape in police custody, the
extent  of trauma  a person experiences  is beyond  the purview of law.”
“Custodial torture” is held to be a naked violation of human dignity and
degradation   which   destroys,   to   a   very   large   extent,   the   individual
personality. It was held that the expression “life or personal liberty” in
Article 21 includes the right to live with human dignity and thus it would
Page 90 of 116
HC-NIC Page 90 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
also include within itself a guarantee against torture and assault by the
State or its functionaries.  The precious right guaranteed  by Article 21
cannot be denied to convicts, under­trials, detenus and other prisoners in
custody, except according to the procedure established by law by placing
such reasonable restrictions as are permitted by law. It was observed that
it cannot be said that a citizen ‘sheds off’ his fundamental right to life the
moment a policeman arrests him. Any form of torture or cruel, inhuman
or degrading  treatment  would  fall within  the inhibition  of Article  21,
whether it occurs during investigation, interrogation or otherwise. It was
further  observed  that  the  interrogation  and  investigation  into  a crime
should be in true sense purposeful to make the investigation effective. By
torturing a person and using third degree methods, the police would be
accomplishing  behind the closed doors what the demands of our legal
order   forbid.   Referring   to  Kasturi   Lal’s   case   (AIR   1965   SC   1039)
(supra), the Supreme Court reiterated what it had said in Nilabati Behera
v. State of Orissa, reported in (1993) 2 SCC 746 : (AIR 1993 SC 1960)
reproducing the following observations which appeared at page 761 of the
reports (at page 1967 of AIR) :
“In this context, it is sufficient to say that the decision of this Court
in Kasturilal (AIR 1965 SC 1039) upholding the State’s plea of
sovereign immunity for tortious acts of its servants is confined to
the sphere of liability in tort,  which is distinct from the State’s
liability   for   contravention   of   fundamental   rights   to   which   the
doctrine   of   sovereign   immunity   has   no   application   in   the
constitutional   scheme,   and   is   no   defence   to   the   constitutional
remedy   under   Articles   32   and   226   of   the   Constitution   which
enables award of compensation for contravention of fundamental
rights,   when   the   only   practicable   mode   of   enforcement   of   the
fundamental   rights   can   be   the   award   of   compensation.   The
decisions of this Court in Rudul Sah (AIR 1983  SC 1086)  and
others   in   that   line   relate   to   award   of   compensation   for
contravention of fundamental rights, in the constitutional remedy
under Articles 32 and 226 of the Constitution. On the other hand,
Kasturilal related to the value of goods seized and not returned to
the owner due to the fault of Government servants, the claim being
of damages for the tort of conversion under the ordinary process,
and not a claim for compensation  for violation of fundamental
rights.   Kasturilal   is,   therefore,   inapplicable   in   this   context   and
distinguishable.”
The   Supreme   Court   then   held   that   the   claim   in   public   law   for
compensation for unconstitutional deprivation of fundamental right to life
and liberty, the protection of which is guaranteed under the Constitution,
is a claim based on strict liability and is in addition to the claim available
in private law for damages for tortious acts of the public servants. It was
held :
Page 91 of 116
HC-NIC Page 91 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
“Award   of   compensation   for   established   infringement   of   the
indefeasible rights guaranteed under Article 21 of the Constitution
is a remedy available in public law since the purpose of public law
is not only to civilise public power but also to assure the citizens
that   they   live   under   a   legal   system   wherein   their   rights   and
interests shall be protected and preserved.”
It was further observed :
“The old doctrine of only relegating the aggrieved to the remedies
available in civil law limits the role of the Courts too much, as the
protector and custodian of the indefeasible rights of the citizens.”
The Court reiterated what was stated in Nilabati Behera’s case that it was
not always enough to relegate the heirs of victim of custodial death to the
ordinary remedy of a civil suit to claim damages, as that remedy in private
law indeed is available to the aggrieved party. The defence of sovereign
immunity being inapplicable, and alien to the concept of guarantee of
fundamental  rights,  there can be no question  of such  a defence  being
available in the constitutional remedy, as held by the Supreme Court in
Nilabati   Behera’s   case   (AIR   1993   SC   1960)   (supra).   We   then   would
reproduce hereunder paragraph 54 of the judgment which in our view
clearly lays down that the State is vicariously liable for the acts of its
public   servants   which   amount   to   an   established   infringement   of   the
fundamental right to life and that the claim of the citizen is based on the
principle of strict liability to which the defence of sovereign immunity is
not available and the citizen must receive the amount of compensation
from the State of such award of compensation in public law jurisdiction is
without prejudice to any other action, like civil suit for damages, which is
lawfully available to the victim or the heirs of the deceased­victim with
respect to the same matter.
“54. Thus, to sum up, it is now a well­accepted proposition in most
of the jurisdictions, that monetary or pecuniary compensation is an
appropriate and indeed an effective and sometimes perhaps the only
suitable remedy for redressal of the established infringement of the
fundamental right to life of a citizen by the public servants and the
State is vicariously liable for their acts. The claim of the citizen is
based on the principle of strict liability to which the defence of
sovereign immunity is not available and the citizen must receive the
amount of compensation from the State, which shall have the right
to   be   indemnified   by   the   wrongdoer.  In   the   assessment   of
compensation, the emphasis has to be on the compensatory and not
on punitive element. The objective is to apply balm to the wounds
and not to punish the transgressor or the offender, as awarding
appropriate   punishment   for   the   offence   (irrespective   of
Page 92 of 116
HC-NIC Page 92 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
compensation) must be left to the criminal Courts in which the
offender is prosecuted, which the State, in law, is duty­bound to do.
The award of compensation in the public law jurisdiction is also
without prejudice to any other action like civil suit for damages
which   is   lawfully   available   to   the   victim   or   the   heirs   of   the
deceased­victim with respect to the same matter for the tortious act
committed   by   the   functionaries   of   the   State.  The   quantum   of
compensation will, of course, depend upon the peculiar facts of each
case and no strait­jacket formula can be evolved in that behalf. The
relief   to   redress   the   wrong   for   the   established   invasion   of   the
fundamental rights of the citizen, under the public law jurisdiction
is,   thus,   in   addition   to   the   traditional   remedies   and   not   in
derogation of them. The amount of compensation as awarded by
the Court and paid by the State to redress the wrong done, may in
a   given   case,   be   adjusted   against   any   amount   which   may   be
awarded to the claimant by way of damages in a civil suit .”
(Emphasis supplied)
15. It is significant to note that the Supreme Court, in terms held that the
amount   of   compensation   as   awarded   by   the   Court   in   its   public   law
jurisdiction and paid by the State to redress the wrong may in a given case
be adjusted against any amount which may be awarded to the claimant by
way of damages in civil suit. From the aforesaid holding of the Supreme
Court in D. K. Basu’s case (AIR 1997 SC 610) (supra), we gain strength in
stating that an action in respect of a tort committed by a public servant,
which violates fundamental right to life, would lie in the civil Court and
when the infringement of fundamental right to life is established, it will
not be open for the State to claim sovereign immunity as a defence and the
State would be vicariously liable for the tortious act committed by its
functionaries which has resulted in such violation of fundamental right to
life.   The   nature   of   liability   that   arises   because   of   the   violation   of
fundamental rights would, in our opinion, remain the same, irrespective of
the forum from which the remedy is sought by the victim or the heirs of
the deceased­victim. It cannot be said that though for violation of the
fundamental right to life by tortious acts of a State employee the superior
Court   may   in   its   extraordinary   powers   award   compensation,
notwithstanding  the availability of the alternative forum,  that liability
changes   its colour  when  the  remedy  is  sought  in the  civil   Court.   The
remedy of compensation under Articles 32 and 226 of the Constitution is
evolved as an additional and speedy remedy and would be over and above
the remedy available, to claim damages for tortious act of a State servant
violating fundamental right to life in a Court of ordinary civil jurisdiction.
The strict liability of the State for such violation can be enforced even in a
civil Court when there is violation of fundamental right to life. Albeit when
the victim approaches  the civil Court,  he will have to go through the
rigmarole of the procedural laws and establish his case as regards the
breach of fundamental right to life by leading appropriate evidence and
Page 93 of 116
HC-NIC Page 93 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
will also have to establish his case as regards his claim for compensation
for   the   wrong   done.   These   detailed   fetters   do   not   operate,   when   the
Supreme Court or the High Court exercises its extraordinary powers. But,
nonetheless,   as   observed   by   the   Supreme   Court,   there   has   to   be   an
established breach of fundamental right to life by a wrongful act of the
public servant to create a strict liability on the part of the State.
16. We must here refer to a decision of the Andhra Pradesh High Court in
Challa Ramkonda Reddy v. State of A. P. by District Collector, Kurnool,
reported in AIR 1989 AP 235, in which it was held that the theory of
sovereign function does not clothe the State with the right to violate the
fundamental right to life and liberty guaranteed by Art. 21 and no such
exception can be read into it by reference to Art. 300 (1). It was held that
where  a   citizen   was   deprived   of   his   life   or   liberty,   otherwise   than  in
accordance with the procedure prescribed by law, it is no answer to say
that the said deprivation was brought about while the officials of the State
were acting in discharge of the sovereign functions of the State and suit for
compensation against the State was, therefore, maintainable in such cases.
It was observed that this was the only mode in which the right to life
guaranteed by Art. 21 could be enforced. We respectfully agree with the
ratio of that decision.
17.  The  facts  which  are established  in the  case  clearly  show  that  the
respondent No. 2, during the course of his employment as a Constable, had
on 22­4­1976, when the respondent No. 1 had come to the Police Outpost,
wrongfully and without any justification whatsoever, wounded him by a
gunshot which resulted in amputation of his right leg. This tort, since it
was   committed   by   the   State   servant,   amounted   to   violation   of   the
fundamental right to life of the respondent No. 1 guaranteed by Art. 21,
raising a strict liability on the part of the State which could be remedied
by giving compensation in a civil Court, on the basis that the State is
vicariously liable for such an act.”
59 In  Bakshi Amrik Singh v. The Union of India (1974 ACJ 105)
(FB), a Bench of five Judges of the High Court of Punjab and Haryana at
length considered all the decisions on the question and ultimately laid
down 11 tests :
“Though sovereign functions of a State have nowhere been exhaustively
enumerated nor is there any authoritative definition of what constitutes
the sovereign functions from a review of the ratio of the various authorities
that have been noticed above, certain rules of guidance, which appear to
be well settled emerge and they may be stated thus :
Page 94 of 116
HC-NIC Page 94 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
1. Under Article 300(1) of the Constitution of India, the Union of India
and the states in our Republic have the same liability for being sued for
torts committed by their employees as was that of the East India Company.
2.  The nature and extent of this liability, as stated in P. and O. Steam
Navigation Company’s case and authoritatively settled by their Lordships
of the Supreme Court in Kasturi Lal’s case is that the Union of India and
states are liable for damages occasioned by the negligence of servants in
the service of the Government if the negligence is such as would render an
ordinary employer liable.
3.  That in view of the rule stated above Government is not liable if the
tortious act complained of has been committed by its servant in exercise of
its sovereign powers by which we mean powers that cannot be lawfully
exercised   except   by   sovereign   or   a   person   by   virtue   of   delegation   of
sovereign rights.
4.  The Government is vicariously liable for the tortious acts of its servants
or agents which are not proved to have been committed in the exercise of
its sovereign functions or in exercise of the sovereign powers delegated to
such public servants.
5.  The mere fact that the act complained of was committed by a public
servant   in   course   of   his   employment   is   not   enough   to   absolve   the
Government of the liability for damages for injury caused by such act.
6.  When the State pleads immunity against claim for damages resulting
from injury caused by negligent act of its servants, the area of employment
referable to sovereign powers must be strictly determined. Before such a
plea is upheld, the Court must always find that the impugned act was
committed in the course of an undertaking or an employment which is
referable to the exercise of the delegated sovereign powers.
7.  There is a real and marked distinction between the sovereign functions
of the Government and those which are not sovereign and some of the
functions that fall in the latter category are those connected with trade,
commerce, business and industrial undertakings.
8.    Where  the  employment  in the course  of which  the tortious  act  is
committed is such in which even a private individual can engage, it cannot
be considered to be a sovereign act or an act committed in the course of
delegated sovereign functions of the State.
9.  The fact that the vehicle, which is involved in an accident, is owned by
the Government and driven by its servant does not render the Government
immune from liability for its rash and negligent driving. It must further be
Page 95 of 116
HC-NIC Page 95 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
proved  that   at  the  time   the  accident   occurred,   the  person  driving  the
vehicle was acting in discharge of the sovereign function of the State, or
such delegated authority.”
60 Although the maintenance of Army is a sovereign function of the
Union of India, yet it does not follow that the Union is immune from all
the liability for any tortious act committed by an army personnel. In
determining whether the claim of immunity should or should not be
allowed, the nature of the act, the transaction in the course of which it is
committed, the nature of the employment of the person committing it
and the occasion for it, have all to be considered.
61 The Old and archaic concept of Sovereign immunity that “King
can do no wrong” still haunts us, where the state claim immunity for its
tortious acts and denies compensation to the aggrieved party. Last but
not the least it would be interesting to note that in Australia also this
doctrine of sovereign immunity has been ignored as can be seen from
the decision in  Parker v. The Commonwealth of Australia [112 CLR
295   (Aus)]   where   two   ships   of   the   Royal   Australian   Navy,   viz.
Melbourne and Voyager, came into collision on the highseas about 20
miles off the Australian cost. Melbourne struck the Voyager and she sank
along with some men therein resulting in the death of one Parker. His
widow brought an action against the Commonwealth for damages on the
basis that her husband’s death was caused by the negligence of the
officers and crew of the  ships  of  the  Commonwealth.  The deceased
Parker was a civilian employed by the Navy Department in a technical
capacity. In those facts and circumstances Windeyer, J., of the High
Court of Australia held that the Commonwealth was liable in tort for
damages   and   that   the   widow   of   Parker   could   bring   in   the   suit   for
damages for the negligent acts or omission of the members of the Royal
Page 96 of 116
HC-NIC Page 96 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Australian   Navy.   The  plea   of   defense   based  on  the  old  and  archaic
concept of sovereignty immunity as borrowed from British jurisprudence
prevalent  during  colonial  rule  is  based on  old  feudalistic   notions of
justice namely the “King can do no wrong”. This common law immunity
do not exist in the realm of welfare state and is against the modern
jurisprudence where the distinction between sovereign or non­sovereign
power does not exist and the state like any ordinary citizen is liable for
the acts done by its employees as has been ruled by the Hon’ble Apex
Court and various High Courts in its various judicial pronouncements.
62 No doubt, the maintenance of law and order by the Police is an
exercise of sovereign and regal powers of the State and amounts to an
act of state. The legal justification of firing by the Army personnel at the
relevant point of time for controlling the riotous assembling is a question
of fact to be established by evidence. Indisputably, the defendants have
not led any evidence except filing of a written statement to show that
the conduct of Army personnel concerned in firing was warranted by
circumstances and diligently  done. On the  other  hand,  the  evidence
placed by the plaintiff discloses that the deceased had gone on the roof
top of his neighbour’s house to collect the quilt, which was put for the
purpose of drying. The deceased had not even the slightest of the idea
that the Army would open fire all of a sudden and he would be hit by a
bullet. According to the State’s contention, firing had to be resorted, as
there was pelting of stones. It is not even the case of the defendants that
the deceased was pelting the stones or was trying to create trouble in
any manner. If the  firing had to be resorted to disperse the  unruly
crowd, then there would be no possibility of bullet hitting the deceased
who was actually inside the house.
63 I shall now discuss how the defendants have failed to prove the
Page 97 of 116
HC-NIC Page 97 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
circumstances under which the firing took place, the mode and manner
of firing by the Army personnel to successfully invoke the plea of act of
State to avoid liability.
64 In the case on hand, the defendants did not deem fit to lead any
oral evidence. All that was done was to file a written statement trying to
justify the firing and the claim of sovereign immunity.
65 The plaint and the written statement are the “pleadings” of the
parties and they stand on a different footing. The pleadings cannot take
the place of  proof according to the Evidence Act. If the pleadings are to
be considered as evidence, then the efficacy of the Evidence Act and the
burden of proving the facts pleaded would be lost. The aforesaid stands
with the exception that after the plaint, if there is an admission in the
written statement, then the Court may not insist for proof, but thereby, it
cannot be said that the power of the Court for insistence of the proof
does not exist on a mere admission, but such power leaves discretion
upon   the   Court  to  act  on   admissions.   Order  VI  Rule   1 of   the  Civil
Procedure Code provides that  pleadings shall mean plaint or written
statement”. Order VI Rule 2, Sub­Rule (1) reads as under:
(1) Every pleading shall contain, and contain only a statement
in  a  concise  form  of  the  material  facts  on  which  the  party
pleading relies for his claim or defence as the case may be, but
not the evidence by which they are to be proved.
The aforesaid makes a fine distinction between the pleadings and
the   evidence   by   which   they   are   to   be   proved.   Pleadings   cannot   be
treated as proof unless there is an admission of the averments stated in
the plaint in the written statement of the defendant.
Page 98 of 116
HC-NIC Page 98 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
66 Mr.   Nanavaty,   the   learned   A.G.P.   appearing   for   the   State   of
Gujarat, first  contended  that  the   case   on   hand is  one  in  which  the
principles of res ipsa loquitur did not apply, as the plaintiffs themselves
have assigned the cause of accident; that the plaintiffs should have,
therefore, affirmatively proved that the death of the deceased was due to
negligence of the Army personnel; that the plaintiffs could not succeed
merely because the State had failed to explain the accident: that even if
the doctrine applied, the onus that lay on the defendant was not an onus
of disproving negligence but that it was sufficient for them to give a
reasonable explanation of the way in which the accident might have
happened, without any negligence on their part; this they had done by
showing that on the day of the incident, a procession of Lord Jagannath
was on the way popularly known as “Rath Yatra” in the State of Gujarat,
there was pelting stones from the side of both the communities when the
chariot was passing through a particular locality; the stone throwing was
also upon the military personnel whose assistance was taken by the State
of Gujarat for maintenance of law and order; the officers despite giving
warning, the pelting of stones was not stopped; the firing was opened
under   the   permission   of   the   Executive   Magistrate,   was   not   of   any
personal vengeance of any nature and no negligence of the State or its
officers, but was with a view to maintain law and order situation which
is a sovereign act of the State.
67 The   above   noted   contention   canvassed   on   behalf   of   the   State
makes it necessary for me to examine the meaning and the scope of the
doctrine of res ipsa loquitur. The expression res ipsa loquitur only means
that “the thing speaks for itself.” When used in connection with cases of
negligence,   it   connotes   that   the   circumstances   attendant   upon   an
accident are of themselves sufficient and of such a character as to justify
an inference of negligence as the cause of that accident. As was said by
Page 99 of 116
HC-NIC Page 99 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
Erle C.J., in ­ ‘Scott v. London Dock Co.’, (1865) 3 H and C 596 (A) :
“Where the thing is shown to be under the management of the defendant
or his servants, and the accident is such as in the ordinary course of things
does not happen if those who have the management used proper care, it
affords   reasonable   evidence,   in   the   absence   of   explanation   by   the
defendants, that the accident arose from want of care.”
68 The doctrine thus depends on the absence of explanation and is
merely a rule of evidence affecting onus. It imports that the plaintiff has
made out a prima facie case without any direct proof of actionable
negligence and this is enough to shift the burden of proof on to the
defendant of giving an adequate explanation of the cause of accident, if
he desires to protect himself.   Since ‘Scott’s case (A)’ there have been
several   cases   where   the   question   of   the   “explanation”   required   of
defendant has been discussed, it is not necessary to examine those cases.
One view is that the principle of res ipsa loquitur is a rule creating a legal
presumption   of   negligence,   and   to   displace   this   presumption   the
defendant’s explanation must exclude negligence and his evidence must
disprove negligence. The case of ­ ‘Woods v. Duncan’, (1946) AC 401
(B)  is   sometimes   regarded   as   an   authority   for   this   view.   The
presumption of negligence theory was also advanced by Asquith L.J., in
the Court of Appeal in the case of ­ ‘Barkway v. South Wales Transport
Co.’, 1948­2 All ER 460 (C). Another view is that the principle is only a
rule of evidence in the sense of shifting the onus on to the defendant,
leaving the ultimate burden of proving negligence on the plaintiff, and
that for discharging his onus it is sufficient for the defendant to give
reasonable   explanation   falling   short   of   disproof   of   negligence.   In   ­
‘McGowan v. Scott’, (1923) 99 LJ (KB) 357n (D) Lord Atkin treated the
principle as equivalent to a statement that on facts in evidence, the
plaintiff has satisfied the burden of proof enough to shift it on to the
Page 100 of 116
HC-NIC Page 100 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
defendant.   When   the   case   of  ‘Barkway   v.   South   Wales   Transport
Company’ went up in appeal to House of Lords, 1950­1 All ER 392 (E)
Lord Normand said that “the maxim is no more than a rule of evidence
affecting onus. It is based on commonsense, and its purpose is to enable
justice to be done when the facts bearing on causation and the care
exercised by the defendant are at the outset unknown to the plaintiff
and are or ought to be within the knowledge of the defendant.” Lord
Radcliff regarded the maxim as nothing more than a rule of evidence “of
which the essence is that an event which in the ordinary course of things
is more likely than not to have been caused by negligence is by itself
evidence of negligence.” He also made the observation that “the true
question   is   not   whether   the   appellant   adduced   some   evidence   of
negligence   but   whether   on   all   the   evidence   she   proved   that   the
respondents had been guilty of negligence in a relevant particular.”
On the whole, it seems to me that the balance of authority is in
favour of the view that the maxim     res ipsa loquitur   when applied to an
action for negligence is merely a rule of evidence affecting onus. It does
not   alter   the   general   rule   that   the   burden   of   proof   of   the   alleged
negligence rests upon the plaintiff. It means that the res or the facts and
circumstances of the accident proved by the plaintiff are by themselves,
without any direct proof of negligence, sufficient      prima facie    evidence
from which an inference of negligence may reasonably be drawn.
The inference may be rebutted by the defendant by proving some
specific cause of the accident for which he was not responsible or by
proving that he was, in fact, not negligent, or by giving a reasonable
explanation and proving it, that the happening of the accident was as
consistent with the absence of negligence as it was with the presence of
negligence. When the defendant has done this, the burden is shifted
Page 101 of 116
HC-NIC Page 101 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
back to the plaintiff.
If   the   defendant   fails   to   give   any   such   evidence,   the   plaintiff
succeeds not because the burden of disproof of negligence is on the
defendant,   but   because   by   reason   of   the   res   or   the   facts   and
circumstances of the accident proved, he has discharged the onus of
establishing his case of negligence. From what has been stated above, it
is clear that there is no room for the operation of the doctrine of res ipsa
loquitur when all the facts are known and the cause of the accident has
been ascertained. As was said by Lord Porter in 1950­1 All ER 392 at
p.393 (E)
“if the facts are sufficiently known, the question ceases to be one where the
facts speak for themselves, and the solution is to be found by determining
whether on the facts as established negligence is to be inferred or not.”
But in my view, it is not correct to say that the principle of res ipsa
loquitur  ceases to apply if the plaintiff assigns a possible cause of the
accident and tenders evidence which does not completely explain the
accident.      If the mere fact of the occurrence is      prima facie      evidence of
negligence, and      res ipsa loquitur      is only a rule for inferring negligence
from the res or circumstances of the accident proved, then it is easy to
see that the effect of the plaintiff’s assigning a cause for the accident and
leading some evidence to explain it can only be to strengthen or weaken
the inference of      prima facie    negligence resulting from the fact of the
accident itself.
In such a case, it is the weight and the cogency of the evidence as
a whole that will determine the inference of negligence. It is difficult to
see how the cogency of the fact of the accident by itself would disappear
by the mere fact of the plaintiff assigning a cause for the accident and by
offering evidence that may or may not completely explain the accident.
Page 102 of 116
HC-NIC Page 102 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
That cogency can disappear or be strengthened or weakened only
on an evaluation of the evidence tendered by the plaintiff. But this is
quite different from saying that  res ipsa loquitur  is excluded when the
plaintiff assigns a cause and offers evidence.
69 In the aforesaid context, let me refer to and rely upon a Division
Bench decision of the Calcutta High Court in the case of  Pranballav
Saba and another vs. Smt. Tulsibala Dassi and another [AIR 1958
Calcutta 713]. In the said case, the issue was whether the letting of
certain premises was for the immoral purpose of carrying on prostitution
and running a brothel. In the plaint, it was alleged that the premises
were let out by one Ranubala Dassi to the defendant for running a
brothel. A case of disorderliness, annoyance and nuisance was also made
in  the  plaint.  The   plaintiffs  being   the  executors  and  trustees  of  the
premises in question prayed for possession. The defendant filed a written
statement and pleaded that she resided with her family and children. In
the said case, like the case in hand, the defendant failed to enter the
witness box and lead any evidence in support of her pleadings in the
written statement. The Division Bench observed in para 14 as under:
“Before   leaving   this   question   of   fact   it   is   necessary   to   emphasize   the
defendant’s absence from the witness­box and the effect of such absence on
the issue of fact. In fact not only the defendant but no witness on her
behalf gave any evidence at the trial. The learned trial Judge says on this
point:
“The counsel for the plaintiff made strong comment on the absence
of the defendant from the witness­box and contended that because
of such absence I ought to presume that she kept herself away from
the witness box in order to prevent the truth coming out of her own
lips. Before the court can be called upon to make any presumption
of the kind it is for the plaintiffs to satisfy the court prima facie that
they have made out a case.”
Page 103 of 116
HC-NIC Page 103 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
The   question   then   is   what   is   a   prima   facie   case.   All   the   evidence   of
reputation  from family  physician,  executors,  trustees,  local  residents  is
there. It is surely prima facie evidence. The distinct charge in the evidence
from the witness box is (1) that the defendant is a prostitute and carries
on prostitution and (2) that she took the house on rent to run a brothel
there. That is the prima facie case. She does not come herself nor calls any
witness to deny these serious allegations of fact. Whether the Judge should
believe one witness or another or one case or another in such a context of
facts is not then a question of prima facie case. It is then a question of the
weight of evidence and its credibility. Prima facie case is not the conclusive
case and the learned Judge mistook the one for the other in his judgment.
The very fact that the defendant neither came to the box herself nor called
any witness to contradict evidence given on oath against her shows that
these facts cannot be denied. What was prima facie against her became
conclusive proof by her failure to deny.”
70 I may also refer to and rely upon on a Privy Council decision in
the case of  Sardar Gurbakhsh Singh vs. Gurdial Singh and another
[AIR 1927 Privy Council 230]. It has observed as under:
“The practice of not calling the party as witness with a view to force the
other   party  to call  him,   and  so  suffer  the  disconfiture   of  having  him
treated as his, (the other party’s) own witness is a bad and disregarding
practice. 32 All. 104 (P.C.) Ref. The true object to be achieved Court of
Justice can only be furthered with propriety by the testimony of the arty
who personally knowing the whole circumstances of the case can dispel the
suspicious   attaching   to   it.   The   story   can   then   be   subjected   in   all   its
particulars to cross­examination.”
“But in any view her non­appearance as a witness, she being present in
Court, would be the strongest possible circumstance going to discredit the
truth of her case.
How did the High Court deal with this? They say:­
“It is true that she has not gone into the witness box, but she made
a full statement before Chaudhri Kesar Ram, Chaudhri Kear Ram
was the Assistant Collector, also known in the Punjab as Revenue
Assistant and it does not scorn likely that her evidence before the
Subordinate Judge would have added materially to what she had
said in the statement.”
Their   Lordships   disapprove   of   such   reasoning.   The   true   object   to   be
Page 104 of 116
HC-NIC Page 104 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
achieved by a Court of Justice can only be furthered with propriety by the
testimony of the party who personally knowing the whole circumstances of
the case can dispel the suspicions attaching to it. The story can then be
subjected in all its particulars to cross examination.”
71 The   Supreme   Court   in   the   case   of  Vidhyadhar   Vishnupant
Ratnaparkhi vs. Manikrao Babarao Deshmukh [AIR 1999 SC 1441]
considered the effect of a party to the suit not appearing into the witness
box and stating his or her case on oath. The Supreme Court observed as
under:
“15…He did not state the facts pleaded in the written statement on oath in
the Trial Court and avoided the witness box so that he may not be cross
examined. This, by itself, is enough to reject the claim that the transaction
of sale between defendant No. 2 and the plaintiff was a bogus transaction.
16 Where a party to the suit does not appear into the witness box and
states his own case on oath and does not offer himself to be cross examined
by the other side, a presumption would arise that the case set up by him is
not correct as has been held in a series of decisions passed by various High
Courts   and   the   Privy   Council   beginning   from   the   decision   in  Sardar
Gurbakhsh Singh v. Gurdial Singh and Anr [AIR 1927 PC 230]. This
was followed by the Lahore High Court in Kirpa Singh v. Ajaipal Singh
and   Ors   [AIR   (1930)   Lahore   1]  and   the   Bombay   High   Court   in
Martand   Pandharinath   Chaudhari   v.   Radhabai   Krishnarao
Deshmukh [AIR (1931) Bombay 97]. The Madhya Pradesh High Court
in  Gulla Kharagjit Carpenter v. Narsingh Nandkishore Rawat [AIR
1970 Madh Pra 225] also followed the Privy Council decision in Sardar
Gurbakhsh   Singh’s   case   (supra).   The   Allahabad   High   Court   in  Arjun
Singh v. Virender Nath and Anr. [AIR 1971 Allahabad 29] held that
if a party abstains from entering the witness box, it would give rise to an
inference adverse against him. Similarly, a Division Bench of the Punjab &
Haryana High Court in  Bhagwan Dass v. Bhishan Chand and Ors.
[AIR 1974 Punj and Har 7], drew a presumption under Section 114 of
the Evidence Act against a party who did not enter into the witness box.”
72 Thus, in Sardar Gur Bux Singh v. Gurudayalsingh [AIR 1927 PC
230],  their Lordships of the Privy Council observed at pages 233 and
234 that it is the bounden duty of a party acquainted with the facts of
Page 105 of 116
HC-NIC Page 105 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the case to give evidence in support of his case; failure to do so would be
the strongest possible circumstance going to discredit the truth of his
case.
73 I am of the view that mere filing of the written statement would
not constitute adducing of legal evidence unless the statement contains a
neat question of law or the Court can take judicial notice of the facts
pleaded in the written statement in accordance with the provisions of
Sections 56 and 57 of the Evidence Act. Merely taking a defence in the
written statement is not sufficient without proving it by evidence in a
suit filed by the plaintiff against the State for damages. It is only the wife
of the deceased who entered into the witness box and was examined as
the PW 1.
74 Let me at this stage take a note of one very important aspect. The
plaintiffs could be said to have satisfactorily discharged the burden open
it for proving the issue No.2 in the affirmative. The plaintiff in her cross
examination­in­chief has stated as to the rash and negligent manner in
which the firing was opened by the Army and how the same led to death
of her husband. She has made out a case of wrongful deprivation of the
life of the deceased resulting into consequence of liability on the part of
the State to pay the compensation. The point, I would like to take note
of,   is   that   except   putting   suggestions   in   the   cross   examination,   the
defendants have not been able to discern anything from the evidence of
the plaintiff on the strength of which the issue No.4 could have been in
the affirmative. It is a settled position of law that mere suggestions are
not   sufficient   to   dislodge   or   disprove   the   case   of   the   plaintiff.
Suggestions in cross examination have no evidentiary value. In absence
of any evidence, nor any material traced in the cross­examination in
support thereof, the findings so far could not have been answered in the
Page 106 of 116
HC-NIC Page 106 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
affirmative by the Trial Court as well as by this Court in the First Appeal.
75 The issue No.1 was on the aspect as to “whether the plaintiff
proves that the deceased Gulam Rasul Rathod died in the police firing on
30th June 1985” and the said is held to be in the affirmative. Whereas the
issue No.2 on the aspect of as to “whether plaintiff proves that the police
was negligent in opening fire in the circumstance of the case”, if was to
be examined in context to the proof produced in support of the said
issue, the same was very much there before the Trial Court through the
deposition   of   the   wife   of  the   deceased  –  one   of   the  plaintiffs,  who
entered into the witness box and offered herself for examination. The
issue No.2 ought to have been answered in the affirmative.
76 I am also not impressed by the submission canvassed on behalf of
the State that as the responsible officer, who opened fire, was not joined
as one of the defendants nor the Union of India was joined as one of the
defendants, no liability can be fastened upon the State Government. It is
too feeble an argument to be countenanced for the purpose of rejecting
the claim of the plaintiff. The incident occurred in the State of Gujarat.
The Executive  Magistrate was very much present at the time of the
incident and it was under his permission that the firing was resorted to.
The State has not even pleaded that the entire area of the route in the
procession of chariot of Lord Jagannath was entrusted to the Army, but
the case pleaded in the written statement by way of defence is that the
Army was deployed to assist the State and such is the reason why the
pleadings were made in the written statement for the permission of the
Executive Magistrate. If the entire area would not have been entrusted to
the Army, then probably, the  permission of the Commandant of the
Army   would   be   required,   but,   in   a   case   where   the   State   had
requisitioned   Army   for   the   assistance   of   the   State   Police   or   for
Page 107 of 116
HC-NIC Page 107 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
maintenance of the law and order in certain areas of the State, the
officers of the Army or the members of the armed force would be acting
on and behalf of the State Government, who had so requisitioned the
services of the Army. In my view, when the members of the armed force
acted upon under the permission of the Executive Magistrate, the suit
could not have been dismissed on the ground that the concerned officer
of the Army was not joined as the party or otherwise. I fail to understand
how   the   State   expects   the   plaintiff   to   pinpoint   a   particular   Army
personnel responsible for the rash and negligent act of firing. How the
State expects the plaintiff to name a particular person? The admissions
in the pleadings are as under:
1. “Admissions in the pleadings :
1. The  day  of  the incident   was the  day  of  Rathyatra   on  which  a
procession is being carried of Lord Jagannathji by Hindus.
2. Because of the law and order situation, the permission was not
granted for the procession of the chariot of Lord Jagannathji.
3. In spite of the non­grant of the permission for the procession of
Lord Jagannathji, Hindus had decided to carryout the procession of
Lord Jagannathji on the same day and procession of the chariot of
Lord Jagannathji was organised and undertaken by Hindus.
4. As it was not possible for the State to stop the undertaking of the
procession of chariot of Lord Jagannathji, in order to maintain law
and order situation, curfew was imposed and assistance of the army
was taken by the State in certain area of the city which included the
area at which the incident happened. In that area, there was also
residence of the deceased.
5. When the chariot was passing through certain area, police opened
Page 108 of 116
HC-NIC Page 108 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
firing. The bullet in the police firing hit the deceased who died on
account of the bullet injury.”
The following pleadings of the original defendants remained
without proof:
2. “The pleadings of the appellants (original defendants) remained without
proof:
1. There   was   stone   throwing   from   both   the   community   when   the
chariot was passing through Sajan Jamadar Mohalla. The stone
throwing   was   also   upon   the   platoons   of   the   military   whose
assistance   was   taken   by  the   State  for   maintenance   of   law   and
order.
2. The   officers   gave   warning   to   the   mob   for   stoppage   of   stone
throwing, but was not responded/or discontinued.
3. The   firing   was   opened   under   the   permission   of   the   Executive
Magistrate.
4. Five rounds were opened in the police firing.
5. The police firing was not on account of any personal vengeance or
by keeping vengeance to a particular community.
6. There was no negligence of the State or its officers, but was with a
view to maintain law and order situation which is a sovereign act
of the State.”
77 This being the legal position, the question to be considered is
whether on the facts taken as a whole, negligence or rashness on the
part of the defendants can or cannot be deduced.
Page 109 of 116
HC-NIC Page 109 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
78 The expression “burden of proof” is used in two senses, i.e. the
burden of proving an issue or issues sometime termed the ‘legal burden’,
and the burden of proof as a matter of adducing evidence during the
various stages of the trial. What is called the burden of proof on the
pleading should not be confused with the burden of adducing evidence
which is described as “shifting”. See, observations in Narayan v. Gopal
[AIR 1960 SC 100]; Pickup v. Thames Insurance Co., [(1878) 3 QBD
594]; Lakshmana v. Venkateswarlu, [76 Ind App 202 : (AIR 1949 PC
278);  15 Halsbury (Simond) 267];  Huyton­with­Roby Urban District
Council v. Hunter, [(1955) 2 All E. R. 398 at p. 400] per Denning L. J.
These two aspects of the burden of proof are enunciated in Sections 101
and 102 of the Evidence Act. Section 101 shows that the initial burden
of proving a  prima facie case in his favour is on the plaintiff. When he
gives such evidence as will support a prima facie case, the onus shifts on
the defendant to adduce rebutting evidence to meet the case made out
by the plaintiff. As the case continues to develop, the onus may shift
back again to the plaintiff.
79 The principles on which the suits of the present nature are decided
are well known. The general rule that it is for the plaintiff to prove
negligence, and for the defendant to disapprove it, would in some cases
cause considerable hardship to the plaintiff as the true cause of the
accident might be solely within the knowledge of the defendant. The
plaintiff  may be able to prove the accident, but it might well be that he
cannot prove how it happened so as to show its origin in the negligence
of the defendant. This hardship is avoided to a considerable extent by
the rule  res ipsa loquitur discussed above. There are cases in which the
accident speaks for itself, so that it is sufficient for the plaintiff in such
cases to prove the accident and no more. It would be then for the
Page 110 of 116
HC-NIC Page 110 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
defendant to show that the accident arose through no negligence of his.
The maxim   res ipsa loquitur applies whenever it is so improbable that
such   an   accident   could   have   happened   without   negligence   of   the
defendant that a reasonable jury could find without further evidence
that it was so caused. It is true that there must be reasonable evidence of
negligence, but where the thing is shown to be under the management
of the defendant or his servants, and the accident is such as in the
ordinary   course   of   things   does   not   happen   if   those   who   have   the
management   use   proper   care,   it   affords   reasonable   evidence,   in   the
absence of an explanation by the defendant, that the accident arose from
want of care. On the other hand, if the defendant produces a reasonable
explanation, equally consistent with negligence and no negligence, the
burden of proving the affirmative, that the defendant was negligent and
that his negligence caused the accident, would still remain with the
plaintiff.
80 I   have   reached   to   the   conclusion   that   in   the   absence   of   any
evidence whatsoever adduced on behalf of the State by examination of
any of its officers or any other witness, it could not have been said that
the pleadings, in the written statement, by way of a defence raised on
behalf of the State, stood proved. If the State was to prove that on
account of stone pelting on the police or the Army, the firing was the
only alternative, then it was necessary for the State to have first proved
that there was pelting of stones. It was also necessary for the State to
prove that no sooner the pelting of stones started, then a proper warning
was given to the mob. It was also necessary for the State to establish and
prove that in spite of the warning, the pelting of stones continued. It was
also necessary for the State to prove that thereafter, the permission of
the Executive Magistrate was obtained for resorting to police firing, and
at the same time, it was necessary for the State to prove that the police
Page 111 of 116
HC-NIC Page 111 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
firing had to be resorted to prevent the mob from pelting of stones and
not for targeting a particular individual so as to take away his life.
Indisputably, neither any documentary evidence has been produced nor
any oral evidence has been led in this regard. In such circumstances,
with just filing of the written statement, the Trial Court ought not to
have dismissed the suit, more particularly, when the plaintiff entered
into the witness box and she stood by the pleadings narrated in the
plaint. This aspect has not been considered by the learned Single Judge
while dismissing the First Appeal. At this stage, let me look into the
Division Bench decision of the Calcutta High Court in the case of Fateh
Chand Murlidhar vs. Juggilal Kamlapa [AIR 1955 Calcutta 465]  on
which strong reliance has been placed by the learned A.G.P. appearing
for the State. In the said case, the Division Bench observed as under:
“17. I shall refer only to two old cases where the law was laid down with
all the clarity and brevity, of Sir Barnes Peacock. Both the decisions are
reported in Vol. IX of the Weekly Reporter. The first of them is the case of ­
‘Sooltan Ali v. Chand Bibee’, 9 Suth WR 130 (A). The head­note of the
case which correctly summarises the decision is in the following words:
“A written statement is not a pleading in confession and avoidance
whereby a defendant is bound by the confession and compelled to
prove the avoidance: if used as evidence against a defendant, the
whole statement must be taken together.”
18. What the learned Chief Justice held in that case with the concurrence
of Dwarkanath Mitter J., was what has subsequently been laid down in
several decisions of the Judicial Committee notably ­  ‘Motabhoy Mulla
Essabhoy v. Mulji Haridas’, AIR 1915 PC 2 (B). The principle is that
while a Court of law is entitled to accept a part of the evidence of a witness
and to reject another part, a pleading cannot be so dissected, but must be
taken  either  as a whole  or left alone  altogether.  In other  words,  if a
written   statement   contains   an   admission   of   certain   facts   which   are
favourable to the plaintiff but contains a denial of other facts favourable to
him or an assertion of other facts which are unfavourable, the plaintiff
must, if he wants to avail himself of the admission, take not only the first
set of facts as truly stated, but also the second set of facts.
Applying that principle to the present case, respondents, if they wanted to
Page 112 of 116
HC-NIC Page 112 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
avail themselves the statement of the appellants were bound to take not
only their admission that a sum of Rs.5,000/­had been paid and that it
had been paid in pursuance of a form of settlement, but also their further
statement that they had been compelled to submit to the settlement by
coercion.
In the case to which I have already referred, Sir Barnes Peacock illustrated
the principle by a hypothetical case.
“Suppose”, the learned Chief Justice observed, “a man should be sued for
goods sold and delivered, and should state and swear to the statement that
the goods were bought and delivered to him in a shop by a person whom
he did not know and that he paid for them at the time.”
If that statement were true, he could not honestly state that he had never
bought the goods; and if the statement that he had bought them, was to be
taken against him without also taking his statement that he paid for them
at the time, the greater injustice might be done, for he would be unable to
compel the attendance of the man who sold the goods, inasmuch as he was
unknown to him; but if the plaintiff being unable to read one part of the
statement as evidence against, the defendant without reading in his favour
what he said as to payment, the plaintiff would have to cite the man who
sold the goods for the purpose of proving his case, and then if the witness
should speak the truth,  the defendant  would make out his defence  by
eliciting from the witness on cross­examination the fact that the defendant
had paid for the goods at the time.”
81 The principles explained by the Division Bench referred to above,
in my view, has no application in the facts of the present case. The
principle was applied to the facts of that case where it was held that if
the  respondents wanted to avail  themselves of  the  statement of the
appellants,   they   are   bound   to   take   not   only   the   admission   that   Rs.
5,000/­ had been paid and that it had been paid in pursuance of a form
of   settlement   but   also   their   further   statement   that   they   had   been
compelled to submit to the settlement by coercion. It cannot be said that
the plaintiff has been able to establish its case only on the basis of the
admission of the State in the written statement as regards resorting to
police firing. Probably, what is sought to be contended on behalf of the
State is that in the written statement, firing has been admitted, but at
Page 113 of 116
HC-NIC Page 113 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
the same time, the justification has also been assigned, then in such
circumstances, the plaintiff is obliged not only to avail himself of the
admission  of firing, but also as regards the justification  to resort to
firing. The Division Bench decision of the Calcutta High Court, in my
opinion,   indicates   that   when   a   statement   on   admission   is   made   in
pleading together with further statement centering round, depending
and standing on and conditional upon that admission, all the statements
are to be taken and considered together in respect of such pleading. But
if   a   statement   on   admission   is   made   unconditionally   and   thereafter
further admission is made which is not conditional or based on such
earlier admission but is an assertion of the specific case not dependent or
conditional upon the earlier admission, the above principle will not be
applicable.   In   the   case   on   hand,   the   plaintiff   has   independently
established that the Army resorted to indiscriminate firing for no good
reason and that too without any prior warning. The rash and negligent
act led to the death of the deceased, thereby violating Article 21 of the
Constitution of India. Having regard to the circumstances proved by the
oral evidence of the wife of the deceased i.e. one of the plaintiffs, the
onus of proving the absence of negligence or the justification to resort to
firing was on the defendants. In Halsbury’s Laws of England Volume:
35, 3rd Edition at page 688, it is stated thus:
“By providing certain circumstances the plaintiff may shift the burden of
proof on to the defendant. Thus, where a vessel under way in daylight and
clear runs down a vessel at anchor, the burden, is on the owners of the
vessel at anchor established a prima facie case when he has shown that his
vessel had a proper light.”
See:  Jalim Ram Mallah vs. The R.S.N. Co. Ltd. [1969 I UJ 63
SC].
82 In   my   view,   the   plaintiff   could   be   said   to   have   satisfactorily
Page 114 of 116
HC-NIC Page 114 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
discharged   the   burden   upon   it   for   proving   the   issue   No.4   in   the
affirmative and the defendant could be said to have failed to discharge
the burden of proving the issue No.4 in its favour.
83 No submissions were canvassed on the question of quantum of
compensation nor pleaded in the defence. According to the evidence of
the plaintiff, her husband was earning Rs.700/­ to Rs.750/­ per month
by   doing   some   petty   business.   In   my   view,   awarding   of   the
compensation, as prayed for, of Rs.90,000/­ (Rupees Ninety Thousand
only) would meet with the ends of justice.
84 In the result, this appeal succeeds and is hereby allowed. The
judgment and decree dismissing the suit and its affirmation thereof by
the learned Single Judge in the First Appeal is hereby quashed and set
aside. The Civil Suit No.3605 of 1986 is allowed with a decree of the
compensation   of   Rs.90,000/­   (Rupees   Ninety   Thousand   only)   with
interest at the rate of 7% per annum from the date of the suit until the
amount is realised. The decree be drawn accordingly.
(J.B.PARDIWALA, J.)
FURTHER ORDER
After the judgment is pronounced, Mr. Maulik Nanavati, the then A.G.P.
made a request that as he is no longer an A.G.P. as on date, the names of two
learned A.G.Ps. attached with this particular Court as on date, be shown in the
appearance so that the State would come to know about the judgment and order
passed by this Court. Let the names of Ms. Nisha Thakore and Mr. Utkarsh
Sharma, the learned A.G.Ps. be shown in the appearance.
(J.B.PARDIWALA, J.)
Page 115 of 116
HC-NIC Page 115 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018
C/LPA/473/1996 CAV JUDGMENT
chandresh
Page 116 of 116
HC-NIC Page 116 of
116
Created On Wed Jan 10 17:41:12 IST 2018